agency

(redirected from agencies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

agency

1. a business or other organization providing a specific service
2. the place where an agent conducts business
3. the business, duties, or functions of an agent
4. one of the administrative organizations of a government

agency

  1. the power of ACTORS to operate independently of the determining constraints of SOCIAL STRUCTURE. The term is intended to convey the volitional, purposive nature of human activity as opposed to its constrained, determined aspects. Although utilized in widely different ways, it is especially central in METHODOLOGICAL INDIVIDUALISM, ETHNOMETHODOLOGY, PHENOMENOLOGY, SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM. The importance of human intention (and possibly also FREE WILL) thus emphasized, places the individual at the centre of any analysis and raises issues of moral choice and political capacity The political problematic is expressed by GOULDNER counterposing ‘man on his back’ with ‘man fighting back’ (1973), but the classic essay is Dawe's (1971) ‘The Two Sociologies’.
  2. any human action, collective or structural as well as individual, which ‘makes a difference’ to a social outcome; thus, for GIDDENS (1984), agency is equivalent to POWER. In this way Giddens opposes any simple polarization of'S tructure’ and ‘agency’. This is related to his view that STRUCTURE must be seen as ‘enabling’ as well as ‘constraining’ (see also STRUCTURE AND AGENCY, DUALITY OF STRUCTURE).

Agency

 

a civil law contract under which one party, the agent, binds himself to perform specified legal acts, such as acquisition of property or making payments, in the name and on the account of another party, the principal.

In the USSR, a contract of agency is one of the legal means to secure participation by citizens and organizations in civil turnover, such as conclusion of deals, through the assistance of other persons. The agent’s performance of legal acts with respect to third persons is based on his being given power of attorney. The principal is obligated to pay the agent a fee if this is provided for by law or the contract.

agency

1. A relationship by which one party, usually the agent, is empowered to enter into binding transactions affecting the legal rights of another party, usually called the principal, as, for example, entering into a contract or buying or selling property in his name or on his behalf.
2. An administrative branch of government (federal, state, or local).
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, there are new recordkeeping requirements imposed upon state agencies.
Group assignments followed an in-class exercise that started with students indicating their most preferred agencies and projects (top three); negotiations followed that yielded a relatively even distribution of students across potential projects.
7 AGENCIES PRIZE INSURANCE COMPANIES THAT COME THROUGH ON PROMISES.
Consequently, agencies may not adequately capture cyber-related crime statistics, and the gross impact of this type of crime, generally, may appear understated.
Consumer organizations can provide experience-based information, technical assistance, access to role models and mentors, disability-specific training, job matching, advocacy on behalf of persons with disabilities and the needs of the public VR program, and a variety of other services that VR agencies would find useful in working with persons with disabilities.
However, Call Report data represent a critical source of information for the bank supervision process, and the banking agencies determined that a postponement was warranted.
Sanio sees today's major rating agencies as "uncontrolled world powers that are directing global capital flows by appraising the credit standing of debtors.
Law enforcement agencies may submit hate crime data in one of three ways: via NIBRS submissions, in an electronic hate crime record layout, or on the Hate Crime Incident Report and the Quarterly Hate Crime Report forms.
MARVEL prefigured much of the kind of information content that most government agencies put online even today.
According to Emerson, many agencies are taking advantage of this resource.
Either the agencies put on a performance without genuinely considering environmental impacts and involving the public, or the process itself has become too slow and expensive without clear guidelines on how agencies should produce the documents and how courts should review them.
The intelligence agencies argue that taxpayers are getting their money's worth.

Full browser ?