agent


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Related to agent: Agent Orange, agent provocateur

agent

a person representing a business concern, esp a travelling salesman
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Agent

 

in Soviet civil law, a party in a contract of agency. The agent’s duties include the performance of specified legal acts, for example, contracts of sale and management of property, in the name of and on the account of a principal party. The agent may be a legally competent (sui juris) citizen or a legal person (if this is allowed by the latter’s charter or statute). The actions performed by the agent directly generate, change, or extinguish rights and obligations of the principal.

The agent is bound to perform the agency in exact conformity with the principal’s instructions, carry out the agency personally, although in instances provided for by law the responsibilities may be transferred to another person (art. 68 of the RSFSR Civil Code), inform the principal upon demand of progress in performing the agency, submit a report on performance of the agency, and transfer to the principal any property obtained in connection with performance of the agency.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

agent

One who is empowered to enter into binding transactions on behalf of another (usually called the principal).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

agent

(networking)
In the client-server model, the part of the system that performs information preparation and exchange on behalf of a client or server. Especially in the phrase "intelligent agent" it implies some kind of automatic process which can communicate with other agents to perform some collective task on behalf of one or more humans.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

agent

(1) An employee of an inbound call center (sales and service) or an outbound call center (telemarketer). See agent turnover.

(2) A software routine that performs an action continuously or when a specified event occurs. Also called "bots," intelligent agents" and "personal agents." See bot.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in classic literature ?
Jurgis was sure that they had been swindled, and were ruined; and he tore his hair and cursed like a madman, swearing that he would kill the agent that very night.
The agent had kept at the door the cab in which he had returned.
I went out to the door, the agent standing below me in the front garden.
The agent and I waited at the door a few moments looking after him.
I was in no humour to speak to the agent, or to allow him to speak to me.
If you seek a return on your call center's investment in service, your best option is to focus on agents.
The blow to agent morale is multiplied, says Stille, by the president's insistence on granting amnesty to millions of illegal aliens and issuing pardons to street criminals.
has aided the evolution of underwriting tools with its ISO HomeValue--an Internet-based residential replacement cost estimator that provides insurers and their agents access to valuable property data upon entry of an address.
Custom-formulated concentrates for most thermoplastics can include a nontoxic blowing agent for food-contact applications and can contain color and other additives.
In the case of a short sale transaction, the agent or broker not only lists, markets and sells the home, but the broker also negotiates directly with the lender or loan service to settle the mortgage payoff at a discount of the balance due on the note.
Lindquist said Broker XSites will "challenge the industry pricing model" just as the company did when it released Agent XSites two years ago.
In the last 20 or so years, the services of an agent, once thought to be reserved for Hollywood actors and ballet megastars, have come to the rescue of Variety-scouring, audition-crashing, bad-outfit-wearing, out-of-work dancers.