agent

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Related to agentive: agentive role

agent

a person representing a business concern, esp a travelling salesman

Agent

 

in Soviet civil law, a party in a contract of agency. The agent’s duties include the performance of specified legal acts, for example, contracts of sale and management of property, in the name of and on the account of a principal party. The agent may be a legally competent (sui juris) citizen or a legal person (if this is allowed by the latter’s charter or statute). The actions performed by the agent directly generate, change, or extinguish rights and obligations of the principal.

The agent is bound to perform the agency in exact conformity with the principal’s instructions, carry out the agency personally, although in instances provided for by law the responsibilities may be transferred to another person (art. 68 of the RSFSR Civil Code), inform the principal upon demand of progress in performing the agency, submit a report on performance of the agency, and transfer to the principal any property obtained in connection with performance of the agency.

agent

One who is empowered to enter into binding transactions on behalf of another (usually called the principal).

agent

(networking)
In the client-server model, the part of the system that performs information preparation and exchange on behalf of a client or server. Especially in the phrase "intelligent agent" it implies some kind of automatic process which can communicate with other agents to perform some collective task on behalf of one or more humans.

agent

A software routine that waits in the background and performs an action when a specified event occurs. For example, agents could transmit a summary file on the first day of the month or monitor incoming data and alert the user when a certain transaction has arrived. Agents are also called "intelligent agents," "personal agents" and "bots." See mobile agent, bot and workflow.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a model of the infant building up conceptions and expectancies of the external world, grounded in agentive aspects of the self that curiously explores the mind of another, as well as his own mind vicariously.
Gonzales Rey further elaborates this by saying that "Stetsenko conceptualise human subjectivity as an agentive and inherently necessary moment within unfolding activity processes.
For teacher preparation for inclusive education to be responsive to this process, it needs to recognize that teachers' capacity to be agentive does not flow spontaneously from acknowledging the social origins of schooling phenomena.
25) and produce messier, but more dynamic, agentive, and contingent pedagogical spaces.
The patterns repeat in a way what was verified in the previous section: there is a greater use of demonstratives (CD and NCD) in Romance languages as a correspondence, in L, to inter-clausal articulator of coordinates and/or adverbial clauses (7 cases), introducer of clarification (5), agentive (3), inter-clausal articulator (substantive clauses) (2), anaphora (11) and intensiveness (6).
the act of bridge building as an agentive strategy aimed at shifting the
Maria's story shows one way that teachers can foster agentive opportunities for young children and support immigrant students in the classroom.
Through their narrative, the students crafted agentive selves and imagined themselves as future leaders in their community (Hull & Katz, 2006).
To create a narrative, one uses sets of cultural tools, resources and relationships that can help in the development of agentive identities (Hull & Katz 2006; Ochs & Capps 1996).
67) These individuals, while highly mobile and agentive, are also vulnerable to abuse, detention, and deportation as a result of their "in-between" legal status; because they are neither citizens of their countries of residence nor registered refugees, their conditions of homemaking are precarious and liminal, even though outside the gaze of the international refugee regime.
The author observed the social engagement of these learners in early years settings in England, listened to the narratives of bilingual adults, and recorded the accounts of monolingual practitioners over a period of three years to understand how these young learners attempted to create new ways of knowing through their interactions as agentive social actors with others and through others.