agglomerate

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agglomerate

a rock consisting of angular fragments of volcanic lava
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

agglomerate

[ə′gläm·ə·rət]
(geology)
A pyroclastic rock composed of angular rock fragments in a matrix of volcanic ash; typically occurs in volcanic vents.
(metallurgy)
A rigid mass of metallic particles that have been joined together by a powder metallurgical technique, such as sintering.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Higher percent AFS clay leads to a greater percent change in agglomerates;
However, agglomerates can form during the melting process.
A ternary phase diagram of DMSO, dichloromethane, and water was constructed to select a suitable zone with an appropriate ratio of the three solvents for the preparation of spherical agglomerates.
The parameters measured in the samples were mean particle size and agglomerates density.
LP series features low friction design for difficult, heat-sensitive, sticky or wet agglomerate.
As filler particles and the resulting agglomerates become smaller in size, dispersion measurement becomes more challenging (ref.
We found that interaction between porous sodium aluminosilicate and negatively charged suspended or colloidal matters or other anionic by-products possibly derived from peroxide bleached pulp, resulted in agglomerates that could be partially removed by flotation.
A special high-speed chopper is also provided in the bottom portion of the side-wall to reduce agglomerates or to control the particle size of a granulate.
The Model 2000 breaks up agglomerates, reduces particle size, over comes surface forces and speeds up chemical reactions involving insoluble materials.
A higher percentage of AFS clay leads to a greater percentage change in agglomerates;
At higher filler concentrations and due to van der Waals forces, they start to interact with each other, entangle loosely, and finally form a network of agglomerates (14-16).