agglutinogen


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agglutinogen

[ə‚glü′tin·ə·jən]
(immunology)
An antigen that stimulates production of a specific antibody (agglutinin) when introduced into an animal body.
References in periodicals archive ?
In some agglutination tests, special agglutinogens have been made by attaching inert particles onto the antigen.
Potential vaccine-target antigens important in disease production include (1) pertussis toxin (lymphocytosis-prorooting factor), which interferes with immune-cell function, contributes to ciliary damage, and aids in attachment to respiratory epithelium; (2) filamentous hemagglutinin, which helps the bacteria attach to cilia of the respiratory tract; (3) pertactin (69-kDa protein), which also enhances bacterial attachment to cilia; and (4) agglutinogens, which may aid persistent attachment to cilia.
However, the Dutch whole-cell vaccine induces low levels of antibodies against pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin and high levels of antibodies to agglutinogens and pertactin (6).