aggradation


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aggradation

[‚ag·rə′dā·shən]
(geology)
(hydrology)
A process of shifting equilibrium of stream deposition, with upbuilding approximately at grade.

aggradation

The addition of a material to the earth’s surface to promote the uniformity of a grade or slope.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aggradation has been severely limited by dams, levees, and embankments that trap silt and starve deltas of new sediments.
Also, a long-term reduction in floodplain aggradation rate has the potential to alter the frequency with which floodplain renewal through avulsion occurs (see below).
It is further proposed here that bioturbation and aggradation processes have also contributed to over-representation of mound deposits as a result of the burial of low-density surface deposits such as stone artefact deposits that may have been associated with other forms of activity occurring near mound sites.
The land above sea level is either being uplifted or built up by aggradation. This map shows the estimated or measured uplift rates in different parts of the country.
The remaining pools may become shallower as a result of aggradation and the lack of scour-forcing features such as large woody debris, and cover may also be reduced.
Each phase is characterised by channel incision initiated during wetter periods and ended with aggradation as the climate dried and discharge waned.
Sediment deposition into reservoirs built for hydropower generation has several negative effects which include loss of storage capacity, bank erosion and slope instabilities, upstream aggradation, and effect on water quality and operating machines (Jain and Singh, 2002) [3].
New Zealand vineyards are planted mainly on flat alluvium and aggradation gravels with slopes of less than 3[degrees].
In addition, Redwood Creek is currently listed as temperature-and sediment-impaired under the Clean Water Act because of past timber harvest, removal of riparian vegetation, widespread streamside landsliding, and channel aggradation. Staff from the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) and Redwood National Park are cooperating in a stream temperature monitoring project that uses in-stream temperature recorders, coupled with imagery from a thermal infrared flight over Redwood Creek, to relate coho distribution to water temperature.
Their aim was to tie the phase of aggradation, when huge quantities of gravels were laid down, and the subsequent phase when they were cut through making river terraces, to the timescale established independently from research into cores drilled into the muds of the ocean floor.
This may result in increases in bed material discharge, causing upstream degradation, downstream aggradation, and bank instabilities along ditches and connected tributaries.