aggregate

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aggregate

1. (of fruits and flowers) composed of a dense cluster of carpels or florets
2. Geology a rock, such as granite, consisting of a mixture of minerals
3. a group of closely related biotypes produced by apomixis, such as brambles, which are the Rubus fruticosus aggregate

Aggregate

Any of a variety of materials, such as sand and gravel, added to a cement mixture to make concrete.

aggregate

any collection of units or parts, however temporary or fortuitous; thus the contrast may sometimes be drawn between mere aggregates, with no internal structure or basis for persistence, and GROUPS, COMMUNITIES, etc, which will usually possess clear internal structure, coherence, cohesion and relative persistence.

Aggregate

 

in mineralogy and petrography, an accumulation and accretion of fragments of one or several minerals of varying shapes and structures. Aggregates are classified as cemented, friable, earthy, porous, or dense. According to the shape of the grain, they are called grainy, crystalline, needle-shaped, cubic, fibrous, tangled fibrous, radial, uniform crystalline, shell-shaped, accumulative, and so on; and according to composition, simple—consisting of a single mineral (for example, quartzite, which consists of quartz, and marble, which consists of calcite)—and complex, consisting of several minerals (for example, granite is an aggregate of quartz, feldspar, and mica).

V. P. PETROV

aggregate

[′ag·rə·gət]
(botany)
Referring to fruit formed in a cluster, from a single flower, such as raspberry, or from several flowers, such as pineapple.
(chemistry)
A group of atoms or molecules that are held together in any way, for example, a micelle.
(geology)
A collection of soil grains or particles gathered into a mass.
(materials)
The natural sands, gravels, and crushed stone used for mixing with cementing material in making mortars and concretes.

aggregate

1. An inert granular material such as natural sand, manufactured sand, gravel, crushed gravel, crushed stone, vermiculite, perlite, and air-cooled blast-furnace slag, which when bound together into a conglomerate mass by a matrix forms concrete or mortar.
2. An inert granular material that may be added to gypsum plaster.

aggregate

General term for the mineral fragments or particles which, through the agency of a suitable binder, can be combined in a solid mass, e.g., to form a pavement (ICAO).

aggregate

To gather, collect or assemble. For example, "to aggregate data" means to gather separate sets of data. As a noun, "aggregate data" is data that has been collected from two or more sources. See content aggregator.
References in periodicals archive ?
sum, minimum, maximium, etc.) we restrict our problem to the class of aggregative functions.
In addition, I would like to pose the question of whether we should understand exercises of the popular initiative in aggregative or deliberative terms.
What we are calling the philosophical and nonphilosophical forms of the aggregative conception of democracy differ in both their moral and their epistemic premises (which are related).
So the possibility of an infinite world presents a graver problem for aggregative ethics than it does for prudential rationality.
The aggregative view has become newly salient, for a great deal of recent attention has been given to the "wisdom of crowds." (35) Those who emphasize crowd wisdom notice that on many questions, the average or majority answer of a large group of people is often better than the answer of an actual or appointed expert.
fabrilis seems to be clearly aggregative, indicating low abilities to disperse (and penetrate) cursorially through the hostile matrix or a predominant role of habitat quality.
The researchers will apply hydrocolloidal aggregative formations to selectively separate bioactive components.
De Marneffe says that because the burdens principle is not aggregative, it is individualistic.
Studies included in the book utilise two of the classical techniques for historical demographic analysis: aggregative analysis and family reconstitution.
The aggregative result of the young boy's violent act would determine his fate-there was only one serious injury and no deaths.
Nevertheless, such disappointments have not been the occasion for abandoning the aggregative approach altogether.