aggregate

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aggregate

1. (of fruits and flowers) composed of a dense cluster of carpels or florets
2. Geology a rock, such as granite, consisting of a mixture of minerals
3. a group of closely related biotypes produced by apomixis, such as brambles, which are the Rubus fruticosus aggregate

Aggregate

Any of a variety of materials, such as sand and gravel, added to a cement mixture to make concrete.

aggregate

any collection of units or parts, however temporary or fortuitous; thus the contrast may sometimes be drawn between mere aggregates, with no internal structure or basis for persistence, and GROUPS, COMMUNITIES, etc, which will usually possess clear internal structure, coherence, cohesion and relative persistence.

Aggregate

 

in mineralogy and petrography, an accumulation and accretion of fragments of one or several minerals of varying shapes and structures. Aggregates are classified as cemented, friable, earthy, porous, or dense. According to the shape of the grain, they are called grainy, crystalline, needle-shaped, cubic, fibrous, tangled fibrous, radial, uniform crystalline, shell-shaped, accumulative, and so on; and according to composition, simple—consisting of a single mineral (for example, quartzite, which consists of quartz, and marble, which consists of calcite)—and complex, consisting of several minerals (for example, granite is an aggregate of quartz, feldspar, and mica).

V. P. PETROV

aggregate

[′ag·rə·gət]
(botany)
Referring to fruit formed in a cluster, from a single flower, such as raspberry, or from several flowers, such as pineapple.
(chemistry)
A group of atoms or molecules that are held together in any way, for example, a micelle.
(geology)
A collection of soil grains or particles gathered into a mass.
(materials)
The natural sands, gravels, and crushed stone used for mixing with cementing material in making mortars and concretes.

aggregate

1. An inert granular material such as natural sand, manufactured sand, gravel, crushed gravel, crushed stone, vermiculite, perlite, and air-cooled blast-furnace slag, which when bound together into a conglomerate mass by a matrix forms concrete or mortar.
2. An inert granular material that may be added to gypsum plaster.

aggregate

General term for the mineral fragments or particles which, through the agency of a suitable binder, can be combined in a solid mass, e.g., to form a pavement (ICAO).

aggregate

To gather, collect or assemble. For example, "to aggregate data" means to gather separate sets of data. As a noun, "aggregate data" is data that has been collected from two or more sources. See content aggregator.
References in periodicals archive ?
As far as I can tell, he offers two reasons for adopting the instrumentalist view: first, that the common good aggregatively conceived is not a realizable end; and second, that the common good instrumentally conceived is able to provide an account of limited government.
Now, a defender of the instrumentalist view might say that this is something like what he had in mind all along--that while the common good aggregatively conceived provides for the normative force and the commonness of the common good, sound practical thinking governed by the features of the aggregative common good indicates that the common good instrumentally conceived is the uniquely appropriate proximate ideal for political deliberation and action.
Given that the difference between these views is only one of scope, there seems to be a powerful argument for preferring the aggregative view to this version of the distinctive good view: since other goods besides the distinctive common good of justice and peace are reasons for action or grounds for the community to make one decision rather than another, the common good aggregatively conceived provides all of the reasons for allegiance than this distinctive good view provides, and more as well.