aggressive mimicry


Also found in: Wikipedia.

aggressive mimicry

[ə′gres·iv ′mim·ə·krē]
(zoology)
Mimicry used to attract or deceive a species in order to prey upon it.
References in periodicals archive ?
While Canary Files present some similarities between these other techniques, the role of the Canary File is more akin to crypsis and camouflage to hide, rather than aggressive mimicry to bait, lure and ambush.
The classification of mimicry largely depends on the functions of the parties involved and has, based on this scheme, been subdivided down to 40 theoretical classes, or types of mimicry [2], though the focus is generally on the most common types: Batesian, Mullerian, and aggressive mimicry.
The biology of Pholcus phalangioides (Araneae, Pholcidae): predatory versatility, araneophagy and aggressive mimicry. Journal of Zoology (London) 211:227-238.
The team said the behaviour - known as aggressive mimicry - was one of two strategies employed by the bug (Stenolemus bituberus) to trap its prey.
Spider flexibly chooses aggressive mimicry signals for different prey by trial and error.
The classical example of aggressive mimicry comes from Aspidontus taeniatus, which has both juvenile and adult color phases similar to the labrid Labroides dimidiatus that establishes parasite cleaning stations for larger fishes.
It's common for insects to sponge defensive chemicals from others, the researchers conclude, but the "aggressive mimicry" of the Photuris firefly sets it, apart.
Aggressive mimicry, prey-specific predatory behaviour and predator-recognition in the predator-prey interactions of Portia fimbriata and Euryattus sp., jumping spiders from Queensland.
Full browser ?