agonist

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agonist

[′ag·ə‚nist]
(biochemistry)
A chemical substance that can combine with a cell receptor and cause a reaction or create an active site.
(physiology)
A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, called an antagonist, with which it is paired.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidently, the feminine genius for receptive identification toward the other has a correspondence in a masculine genius for agonistic differentiation from the other.
To understand the patterns of competitive interactions in arid environments, we observed native and non-native bees in the Tehuacan desert in Mexico to determine whether individuals of the oligolectic bee Lithurgus littoralis Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) displayed agonistic behavior to A.
This study does identify a difference in agonistic behaviors between the two groups.
The London-based political theorist argues that this unique project of political and economic integration must redefine itself along agonistic lines in order to survive.
Average values of the acoustic parameters of the calls produced by Didelphis aurita (N = 450) and Artibeus lituratus (N = 5) during agonistic interactions near infructescences of two Cecropia species in southeastern Brazil.
Summarizing, animals spending more time standing and idling, with elevated number of agonistic interactions, stereotypies plus adaptive behaviors and vocalizations, reduced time ruminating, ruminating while lying and time eating are more prone to produce milk with reduced stability to the ethanol test.
Crayfish present an attractive model for the study of aggression and social hierarchies because of their ritualized, agonistic behavior (Huber et al.
Additionally, after removal of partitions, the time spent exhibiting agonistic behavior increased (P < 0.
The chapters are arranged chronologically, so the relationship between the two pursuits is presented as a progressively agonistic one.
In natural environment, the crustaceans live under fissures, burrows, stones or gastropod shells that protect specimens during agonistic encounters in intra and interspecific interactions (GARVEY et al.
It may be valuable to hold up the ideal of an agonistic palabre, but it appears unlikely that African societies and polities might be able to make extensive use of a process in which every possible belief or assumption about the ordering of society and proper individual conduct is open to rejection.
The book's utilization of "cross genre" literary sources articulates, in a revealing way, the complex and highly agonistic political picture in which the South African TRC conducted its challenging work.