agonistic behavior


Also found in: Medical.

agonistic behavior

[¦ag·ə¦nis·tik bi′hāv·yər]
(psychology)
In social animals, fighting and escape behavior common in males during the rutting season.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
2016), and only three species have had their agonistic behavior studied (Boake 1984, de Mello and dos Reis 1994, Prado 2006).
The percent of piglets performing agonistic behavior was higher (P < 0.05) during the first 12 hours in the nursery amongst those with no environmental enrichment compared to the piglets with access to environmental enrichment (Figure 2).
Current study failed to register sharing of shelter by the prawns in any of the tested conditions; during the few recorded visits to the shelter, an agonistic behavior (attack or threat) was expressed towards other co-species.
Thus we speculate that the lack of behavioral dominance and overall lower level of agonistic behavior that we observed in the neutral arena may have resulted from the absence of habitat structure cues, i.e., there was no perceived resource to defend.
-The finding of only isolated individuals in the wild (occurring tens or even hundreds of meters apart), and the territorial and conspecific agonistic behavior exhibited in captivity (remarkably, even by newly released recruits), suggests that Q.
The presence of bites is associated with agonistic behavior. In Abronia vasconcelosii, nine aggressive, interspecific and intraspecific, behavioral patterns have been recorded.
Keywords: Blackstripe topminnow, northern studfish, banded killifish, northern starhead topminnow, agonistic behavior
Agonistic behavior is a fundamental factor of ecological nature, and aggression has been studied extensively in many invertebrate species such as bees [80, 81], ants [8284], termites [85], wasps [86], lobsters [87-90], crabs [91], and crayfish [92-94].
Effects of boar presence on agonistic behavior, shoulder scratches, and stress response of bred sows at mixing.
Observations made during this study may indicate that agonistic behavior occurs only within well-defined territories such as dust bathing sites and trails associated with burrows.