agoraphobia

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agoraphobia

a pathological fear of being in public places, often resulting in the sufferer becoming housebound

agoraphobia

[ə‚gȯr·ə′fōb·ē·ə]
(psychology)
Abnormal fear of open places.
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It would be a huge honour if it did well and I hope it would inspire other agoraphobics, or anyone at all for that matter, that you don't have to give up or let anything get in the way of your dreams," she said.
There has been no evidence that age of onset or frequency of panic predicts an agoraphobic response, however, agoraphobia tends to develop in younger individuals.
Fisher's relative isolation and intellectual intensity contributed to the rigorous and hermetic, almost agoraphobic, character of his early films.
The play's agoraphobic, obsessive-compulsive heroine builds a mechanical clone of herself and dispatches it to find her Chinese mother, but the situation goes hilariously awry.
Although Scott's cool, Kennedy-era look and soundtrack choices and the star's usual full commitment to his role keep making us want to cut the piece slack, there's trouble from the get-go accepting that Cage's Roy Waller - an agoraphobic neat freak who has to count three times before opening doors and gets seizures when exposed to sunlight - is also a top L.
Relationship between balance system function and agoraphobic avoidance.
One or two members of the team are feeling a little agoraphobic, having given up their individual offices for a splendid 21st century open plan layout, while retail therapy in the shopping centre next door is proving expensive for some.
Framed by a somewhat cloying voice--over recited by a seemingly agoraphobic young woman, it abruptly shifts gears, becoming a parody of literary culture and romantic identity when the woman becomes, literally overnight, a celebrity novelist.
If you're agoraphobic, then your home becomes a safe haven, the thought of leaving is just unbearable.
Agoraphobic volunteers believed that, if plunged into a feared situation, they would experience skyrocketing anxiety and a sense of panic.