agrarian

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agrarian

a person who favours the redistribution of landed property
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Minding a modest government: Although Randolph was a countryman with Thomas Jefferson and James Madison and he shared their devotion to decentralized republicanism, Randolph parted company with these titans of American statecraft rather than abandon his advocacy of agrarianism.
Focusing on the connections between agrarianism and the environment, moreover, Robertson shows how Gay's fiction mourns the man-made devastations of this particular region of the South.
The "Parliamentary men" (54), betrayed the revolutionary moment of the Land War according to Anna Parnell and the Ladies' Land League, suppressing not only the radical agrarianism of the "No Rent" manifesto but also feminism in the political sphere.
Contract notice:services to support the educational, cultural and recreational benefit of the rural population, promoting the activities of educational farms, maturing in the school population through new knowledge about local agriculture and agrarianism, creating educational spaces for experimentation educational opportunities and guidance synchronic functional.
Agrarianism can be seen more clearly when it is contrasted and shown as having existed in parallel with each of these stages of economic world development.
Culturally salient are counterculture movements like traditionalism, agrarianism, peasantism, ethno-nationalism, the hippie movement--and any other type of return to tradition, to the age-old respect for nature.
The new communes variously promoted community and individualism, separation from society as well as cooperation with surrounding communities, and rural agrarianism in addition to new technologies.
Agrarian traditions are closely linked today with sustainability by New Agrarianism, including what Davis describes as urban agrarianism, as well as in other efforts to meld traditionalism with ecological concerns, such as geo-libertarian economics.
The fourth chapter revolves around Cleveland Indians great Bob Feller, who was fashioned into a symbol representing not only the stubborn refusal of agrarianism to disappear but its ability to claim mythic proportions in the American cultural landscape.
In order to address this paradox, Thompson offers an argument to bring together the virtues, ideals, and heritage of American agrarianism.
Agrarianism emphasized rural culture and the value of agricultural work in America.