air leakage


Also found in: Acronyms.

air leakage

[′er ‚lēk·əj]
(mechanical engineering)
In ductwork, air which escapes from a joint, coupling, and such.
The undesired leakage or uncontrolled passage of air from a ventilation system.

air leakage

1. The volume of air which flows through a closed window or door in a given length of time as a result of the difference in air pressure on its opposite faces.
2. In ductwork, air which escapes from a joint, coupling, etc.
3. The undesired leakage or uncontrolled passage of air from a ventilation system.
4. The flow of uncontrolled air through cracks or openings in an enclosure within a building (such as a HVAC plenum) or through the surfaces which enclose the building.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a parallel FPTU experiences 5% primary air leakage, then the performance of a variable airflow series FPTU will typically outperform the parallel unit.
A primary factor that influences air leakage is pressure gradients between the exterior and interior of the building.
The deformation modes of the steel box and the progression of the air leakage obtained from the simulations with the deformable impactor are very similar to those with the rigid impactor.
According to Persily (1982) and Shaw & Kim (1986), air leakage results from pressurization testing vary seasonally on the order of 25%, with the minimum value in late summer and fall, and the maximum value in winter and early spring.
If any combination of the aforementioned clues has been observed at your site, air leakage testing can help you identify the root causes.
Some of the more common air leakage points can include ceiling pot light fixtures on upper floors, electrical boxes, inside to outside wiring, plumbing and duct penetrations, bathroom exhaust fans installed in attic ceilings, the joints between windows or doors and the surrounding walls, and floor-wall joints.
Further inspection revealed 91 air leaks and total air leakage estimated at 332 cfm, equivalent to the total cfm produced by one 75-hp compressor.
We have energy codes that require buildings to use efficient windows, insulation and limit air leakage.
2-2010 allows the required mechanical ventilation rate to be reduced under certain circumstances when the air leakage has been measured.
That said, it's always a good idea to hire a professional to perform a home energy audit, during which he or she will measure air leakage and make recommendations for sealing leaks.
The audits will include air leakage testing, heating and cooling system evaluations and a review of the property's last year of utility bills, and will provide recommendations on how to make the structure more energy efficient.
Recommended for walls, floors, unvented and vented attics and ceilings, JM ocSPF insulation will insulate cavities of any shape, creating a "seamless" protective air barrier that minimises or eliminates air leakage for maximum building envelope performance.