air pocket

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Related to air pockets: air turbulence

air pocket

a localized region of low air density or a descending air current, causing an aircraft to suffer an abrupt decrease in height

air pocket

[′er ‚päk·ət]
(engineering)
An air-filled space that is normally occupied by a liquid. Also known as air trap.
(meteorology)
An expression used in the early days of aviation for a downdraft; such downdrafts were thought to be pockets in which there was insufficient air to support the plane.

air pocket

An air-filled volume within a section of piping (or an apparatus) which is normally filled with liquid.

air pocket

An area of reduced pressure in the air in which the aircraft looses height rapidly and creates an illusion of absence of air to support the aircraft. The resultant effect is rather unpleasant. An air pocket can also produce the reverse effect, but the experience is not as unpleasant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high-altitude transport also explains why the air pockets are drier than the surrounding air, Anderson said.
Calculate the estimated heat transfer resistance of the mesh with air pockets, to evaluate the benefits of their use compared to traditional coil mesh;
As a corpse decomposes, tissues break down, releasingbits of nitrogen-containing compounds into the surrounding soil and air pockets.
He also said that air pockets are normal occurrences but they usually do not cause much damage to planes or lead to serious injuries to those on board.
The paste hardens into a spongelike structure full of air pockets.
The mixture has air pockets, which means that when the waste breaks down it does so using oxygen.
The injuries include massive bleeding from extremity wounds, trauma to the chest cavity in which air pockets develop and obstruction of airways.
One layer of the sheeting is sucked into the holes and the other layer is laminated on to its back, creating air pockets.
Its multi-layer structure with air pockets enhances the insulation properties of the cup.
Chicken feather fibers are unusual, Yang says, because they are very light and they contain lots of small air pockets arranged like a honeycomb.
The multi-layered cup is designed with a corrugated middle layer of tiny air pockets that insulates beverages similar to that of a thermos.