air spring


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

air spring

[′er ‚spriŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
A spring in which the energy storage element is air confined in a container that includes an elastomeric bellows or diaphragm.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 1990, with the rapid development of computer technology, scholars began to use computer simulation software, such as SIMPACK and Matlab Simulik, to study the air spring. In 1998, Alf Homeyer used the finite element method to carry on the optimized design to the air spring.
The NS inverted pendulum is realized through the reverse installing of the air spring. When the payload is very large (about 1000 kg), the cross-sectional area of the air spring is relatively small, which can be equivalent to simply supported beam structure.
The air springs business unit is the manufacturer of Goodyear air springs that are used in suspension systems, cabs and seats of commercial vehicles.
There have been some researches on the use of air spring for suspension systems.
To avoid a possibility of derailment for a railway vehicle, the control of height difference of air springs is required.
"Since air spring studs are relatively long, and use fine threads, it took significant time and effort to run them down the stud with resistance-heavy, prevailing torque nuts," says Grey Copeland, senior project engineer.
It prevents accidental and unnecessary air spring deflation on your FMTV truck.
Other features are its inline air spring design, measuring 23.5 in.
The Commission is concerned that, by eliminating Phoenix as an independent competitor, the dominant position of Continental in the field of air spring suspension and conveyor belt products could be strengthened.
Bridgestone/Firestone Vehicle Systems introduced the first aftermarket applications utilizing DUAL RATE Air Spring technology and the Intelliride control-system developed by Firestone Industrial Products.
Besides the typical column of air, air springs can contain a column of fluid within a fabric-reinforced rubber envelope, or "bellows." Sealed by "bead plates" containing attachment hardware and air fittings, the fabric in the bellows walls restricts radial expansion so that the internal pressure developed by air flowing into the air spring causes it to extend axially.