air-raid shelter


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air-raid shelter

[¦er ‚rād ¦shel·tər]
(civil engineering)
A chamber, often underground, provided with living facilities and food, for sheltering people against air attacks.
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References in periodicals archive ?
While all that was left of the Palmers' air-raid shelter was found on the roof of a house in Rhymney Street.
Yesterday's search involved specialist teams bringing in mechanical diggers and sniffer dogs to an air-raid shelter near a scrapyard on the site of a former colliery in Acornclose Lane, Sacriston.
Once used as a dormitory air-raid shelter for the cathedral choristers during the Second World War, the space had fallen into disrepair before the benefactor came forward.
The next day we saw that the four houses adjacent to ours had been destroyed and everyone buried in the air-raid shelters.
APPEAL: Edward Donnelly is presumed dead; HUNT: Police searched an air-raid shelter on Acorn Close Lane
Our students study World War Two in their history lessons and the uncovering of the air-raid shelter and its contents has made the period more 'real' and relevant to them.
The restaurant at Henley College, in Bell Green, was transformed into a 1940s air-raid shelter for two days this month.
AN AIR-RAID shelter finally saw some action last night - more than 50 years after the war.
Sheets of corrugated steel and a frame of railway sleepers buried with the motor suggest it was used as a makeshift air-raid shelter.
The wail of the air-raid siren and the hasty evacuation from bed to the air-raid shelter became second nature.
The author would also like know if there was an air-raid shelter on St Paul's Church Ground.
Dogs were not allowed to accompany their owners down into the underground stations during air raids, but had to be left at home or in air-raid shelters in gardens.