airburst

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airburst

[′er‚bərst]
(ordnance)
Any burst in the air, but usually the bursting of a projectile or bomb above the ground with resulting spray of fragments. Also known as aerial burst.

airburst

An explosion of a bomb or a projectile above the surface as distinguished from an explosion on impact with the surface or after penetration. Special fuses are used for this purpose.
References in periodicals archive ?
During an ensuing exchange the camera recorded 38 undetermined explosions, one airburst, 44 projectiles fired west to east, four projectiles fired north to south, and 71 projectiles fired east to west, all 4-5km east-south-east.
Anyway, whatever discussion we had on the subject ended with another airburst and Lidka jerking backwards with a little scream: hit in the face.
About a quarter of the total deaths arise from tsunamis caused by impacts (once every 10,000 years), and another quarter from continental cratering events and low airbursts.
But artillery scored in being able to use time fuzes for airbursts, giving better downward fragmentation against troops behind cover.
More data on airbursts build up our understanding based on empirical observations.
Chapman (Southwest Research Institute) warns that we shouldn't lose sight of the potential damage from Tunguska-like airbursts.
This makes soldiers extremely vulnerable to snipers and to airbursts from 82mm mortar fires.
Once in position to provide maximum protection to protect the ship from incoming radar- or IR-guided anti-ship missiles, the decoy dispenses a cloud of metal-coated glass-fiber chaff and a series of multispectral IR airbursts.
It ended over the southeastern Sierra Nevada foothills with two airbursts, 26 seconds apart, that were strong enough to register on seismographs in the region.
Melott studied two possible cometary airbursts with Brian Thomas, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Washburn University, Gisela Dreschhoff, KU adjunct associate professor of physics and astronomy, and Carey Johnson, KU professor of chemistry.
Studies of atmospheric airbursts also argue for an asteroidal origin (S&T: March 1993, page 15).
One reason for the shortfall is that many airbursts go unreported, even though satellites detect them, because the systems and their handlers are watching for hostile activity and often either overlook or ignore natural events.