airburst

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airburst

[′er‚bərst]
(ordnance)
Any burst in the air, but usually the bursting of a projectile or bomb above the ground with resulting spray of fragments. Also known as aerial burst.

airburst

An explosion of a bomb or a projectile above the surface as distinguished from an explosion on impact with the surface or after penetration. Special fuses are used for this purpose.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Anyway, whatever discussion we had on the subject ended with another airburst and Lidka jerking backwards with a little scream: hit in the face.
They would need to come from a comet that released them in an airburst or forged them on impact from its own carbon-rich ices.
The ammunition continues to use the original 35 x 228 mm case but with the original neck expanded to 50 mm to accommodate a new `Supershot' APFSDS-T (having twice the muzzle energy and penetration performance of the 35 mm equivalent) or a so-called HETF-T The latter is an HE round with a programmable electronic time fuze (TF) capable of creating airbursts; an impact fuze function is also available.
About a quarter of the total deaths arise from tsunamis caused by impacts (once every 10,000 years), and another quarter from continental cratering events and low airbursts.
Army Field Manual (FM) 3-21.10, The Infantry Rifle Company, states, "[i]f required, the company commander can even call for artillery fires right on his company position using proximity or time fuses for airbursts." Although our doctrine outlines the idea of using fires danger close to one's own position, it is not adequately trained or thoroughly analyzed in the Army today.
"We tested at ranges our to 500 meters, and the OICW consistently delivered airbursts within a very tight pattern." The successful rest results demonstrate the OICW's readiness to proceed to the next step of development, Strobush said.
But artillery scored in being able to use time fuzes for airbursts, giving better downward fragmentation against troops behind cover.
More data on airbursts build up our understanding based on empirical observations.
Chapman (Southwest Research Institute) warns that we shouldn't lose sight of the potential damage from Tunguska-like airbursts. "Atmospheric breakup and explosion in the lower atmosphere may be even more damaging than if the object hits the ground intact," he says.
This makes soldiers extremely vulnerable to snipers and to airbursts from 82mm mortar fires.