airport elevation

airport elevation

The highest point of an airport's usable runways measured in feet or meters above mean sea level to an accuracy of 1 ft (½ m). In a few countries, the airport elevation is determined at the airport reference point (ARP). It is depicted on aeronautical charts as well as at prominent points, especially on the air traffic control tower. The same as aerodrome elevation See also airport reference point.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you have 2000 feet above the airport elevation, are two minutes from the runway, and are descending 1000 feet per minute, you'll make it with just a bit to spare.
* 2: "...the ceiling will be at least 2000 feet above the airport elevation...." Using the appropriate weather forecast, the ceiling (broken or overcast) must be at least 2000 feet.
A plane's maximum operating temperature depends on a variety of factors, including airport elevation. But as temperatures climb far higher than 100 degrees Fahrenheit, airlines can begin suspending operations for certain types of planes, as American Airlines did in June when daytime highs in Phoenix climbed to about 120 degrees.
When the flight path was not captured, the captain, without informing the first officer, changed the autopilot mode and descended at a rate that violated UPS's stabilized approach criteria once the airplane descended below 1,000 feet above the airport elevation.
The FAA standard is 3,200 feet, and we've added another 100 feet onto that to accommodate variations in air temperature and airport elevation."
Since the airport elevation is about 1,000 feet, it's usually several degrees cooler than the surrounding area.
(2) For civil aircraft...other reliable information appropriate to the aircraft, relating to aircraft performance under expected values of airport elevation and runway slope, aircraft gross weight, and wind and temperature.
(Basic minimum for the LOC-7 approach is 1000 MSL, to which we added the required 100 feet for remote altimeter.) As the chart says, that 1000 MSL translates into 611 feet above the touchdown zone elevation of 389 feet, so 1100 MSL is 711 feet above TDZE (and 703 feet above airport elevation).
Load this in a GPS, the first "waypoint" is 1499 feet because airport elevation is 1099 feet and departures begin at 400 feet AGL.
The downwind leg should be flown approximately 1/2 to one nm out from the landing runway and at a specified pattern altitude (airport elevation in msl plus 1000 feet).
The brown tints for terrain appear when terrain exceeds 4000 feet over airport elevation, or terrain within six NM of the airport exceeds 2000 feet over airport elevation.

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