airspace structure

airspace structure

The structure that defines the physical dimensions of the elements into which the airspace is divided, such as control zones, terminal control areas (TCA), control area extensions, and airways.
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The Arab world's second biggest economy set the ball rolling by introducing in 2017 fag-end the world's first airspace structure completely based on Performance Based Navigation (PBN) with a Navigation Specification of RNAV-1 (GNSS).
It expects air traffic to double in 20 years, growth which it says it is unable to handle with the current airspace structure.
Flight planning must take into account the conditions of landing strips, the likelihood of inclement weather, the availability of alternate landing zones, all without a formalized airspace structure.
Europe's fragmented airspace structure is inefficient and costs more to operate than equivalent regions around the world.
The UAE airports and airspace structure, capabilities and investments are considered amongst the best not only in the Middle East, but worldwide.
The elimination of this limiting factor from the organisation of airspace is important not only to the regions composed of many relatively small countries but also to large countries with an airspace structure that cannot create conditions to ensure more effective flights.
In the main, the determination of airspace structure in the air traffic management system creates the first barrier assuring the prevention of possible conflict situations and the basis for performing the efficient flows of flights.
Dubai The CEO of Dubai Airports has voiced his support for a proposal to optimise the region's airspace structure.
New airspace structure in the area of the Dutch and German border A new airspace structure in the area of the Dutch and German border went into effect March 11.
In other words, whether by remaining at a relatively low altitude, by restricted routing or both, the flight is conducted outside the en route airspace structure normally the province of air route traffic control centers, or ARTCCs.
In September 2007, after 9 years of evaluation and a cost of over $53 million, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced it would begin implementing a new airspace structure for the New York/New Jersey/Philadelphia metropolitan area.
She said: "This report has a four-point recommendation but there's already been a review that's taken place that's resulted in a new airspace structure and we've also issued new intercept regulations and started working towards new air separation measures.