airspeed

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Related to airspeeds: Indicated airspeed

airspeed

the speed of an aircraft relative to the air in which it moves

airspeed

[′er‚spēd]
(aerospace engineering)
The speed of an airborne object relative to the atmosphere; in a calm atmosphere, airspeed equals ground speed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Expectedly, liftoff airspeeds were higher than touchdown airspeeds, but both were slightly higher for the 5000, despite its lighter airframe.
The problem partially stems from decades of misusing airspeed indicators.
The flight simulation results proved the display to be successful in obtaining direct specific excess power contours from level acceleration light tests and in providing guidance for flights along constant specific excess power contours at low airspeeds. However lights along zero specific excess power contours and along constant [P.sub.S] contours at very high speeds were not successful.
Maintaining the indicated airspeed required looking at the instrument panel, while also looking out to line up on the ship's centerline.
Results of the spray chamber trials showed that, compared with non air-assisted spraying, higher airspeeds ([is greater than] 25 m [s.sup.-1]), smaller droplets and a higher airflow promote the coverage of all underside locations and, at the bottom of the canopy, of the upper side of the leaves (small droplets).
With this new value of the body drag coefficient, the characteristic airspeeds for Sabine's gull are Vmp = 9.3 m/s, Vmr = 16.3 m/s.
So if these speeds can vary from time to time by a few knots here and there, why are we spending all this energy trying to nail down and write down these airspeeds? Instead of slavish adherence to specific airspeeds, perhaps there's another metric?
* Lower Red Radial: Minimum controllable airspeed, VMC, for a multiengine airplane operating with a failed engine.
At the abeam, my airspeed tracked nicely with my AOA, so I shifted focus onto my indexers and began an approach turn.
The aircrewman would kick out the heaviest objects, and the flying pilot would call out "abort" or "wave off." We'd abort the takeoff if we had runway left and the engine failed, and wave off if we had sufficient airspeed to fly and no safe landing place in front of us.