airman

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airman

[′er·mən]
(mining engineering)
A worker who constructs brattices.
(ordnance)
An enlisted man in the military air force.

airman

i. A loose term for air force personnel below an officer's rank.
ii. An Air Force rank below that of an NCO (non-commissioned officer) and equivalent to the army's other ranks.
iii. A tradesman certified by appropriate authority to work on aircraft.
iv. A generic term for one who flies; an aviator; an aircrew member, a pilot, or a navigator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Raskova's achievements made her a natural as a flight instructor, and her three regiments of Soviet airwomen, including the famed 588th Night Bomber Regiment, became the first women to take part in combat operations.
"Book Review of Pioneer Airwomen." Women in Aviation: The Publication (May June 1990): 9.
(42) Krylova generously acknowledges Laurie Stoff's recent book, They Fought for the Motherland: Russia's Women Soldiers in Worm War I and the Revolution (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006); and Reina Pennington, Wings, Women, and War: Soviet Airwomen in World War II Combat (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2001).
In early 1941, the adjutant-general, Major-General Browne, "made a recommendation to the minister of national defence that a 'Canadian Women's (Army) Service' be established." (33) While there was still some resistance to the idea, the planned arrival of a substantial number of British airwomen to work on the British Commonwealth Air Training Stations increased public pressure to enlist Canadian women.
A 1950s briefing paper for the officials revealed how in the past commanders were told to be alert to airwomen who played cricket or hockey, or spent a lot of time writing letters or telephoning to female comrades, seen as possible signs of attraction to other women.
The expertise they gain here has seen officers, airmen and airwomen from Boulmer deployed overseas in the Falklands, Iraq and, of course, Afghanistan.
(7.) Anne Noggle, A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II, 1st ed.
During World War II it was requisitioned as a base for 80 Canadian airwomen.
Written for general audiences as well as aviation and military buffs, this book is one of the first to directly compare the service of the WASPs and the Soviet airwomen and notes that while the former group did not fly in combat missions, they still experienced casualties while fighting for their country.
A drop in the number of men joining the service prompted RAF chiefs to make moves in 1979 to abolish regulations banning airwomen from using guns.
At the start of the war, male pilots scathingly referred to the ATA as the Always Terrified Airwomen. But by the end, they had learned to respect ther female counterparts.
In the end, it must be underlined that the editor, Wg Cdr Ross, author of 75 Years and The Queen's Squadron, has hit the target with a collection of personal stories about an impressive range of experiences by an impressive array of airmen and airwomen. Readers should gain an understanding of what life has been like in the RAF as well as an increased appreciation of its wide range of roles during the various eras of its history.

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