alewife


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alewife:

see herringherring,
common name for members of the large, widely distributed family Clupeidae, comprising many species of marine and freshwater food fishes, including the sardine (Sardinia), the menhaden (Brevoortia and Ethmidium), and the shad (Alosa).
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alewife

[′āl‚wīf]
(vertebrate zoology)
Pomolobus pseudoharengus. A food fish of the herring family that is very abundant on the Atlantic coast.
References in periodicals archive ?
A comparison of scale and otolith aging methods for the alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus.
Currently the salmon fishing in Lake Michigan is great because the alewife population has again plummeted and the fish are so hungry they will bite on just about anything.
The alewife showed up in Lake Ontario in 1873, and reached Lake Michigan in 1943.
Bar (New Haven); Bank Street Brewing (Stamford); Alewife Grille & Brewery (Glastonbury; closed in 1997); and Post Road Brewing (Waterbury; later named Ledge Light Brewery & Restaurant; closed in 1998).
1) We present a fully functional design of a multigrain shared-memory system, called MGS, and provide a prototype implementation of MGS on the Alewife multiprocessor.
Historically, the largest silvers (up to 30 pounds) came from southeast Alaska and British Columbia rivers, but since introductions of the species to the Great Lakes in the 1950s (to help control rampant alewife populations) larger specimens have been taken there.
Juveniles of the freshwater white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) and clupcids (mostly the anadromous alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus) were far more abundant in the upper half of the study reach (0.
Predatory coho and chinook salmon were stocked into Lake Huron in the 1960s to control explosive populations of two other exotic species, the alewife and the rainbow smelt.
All lake trout lakes contain zooplankton, but many lakes lack intermediate trophic links: Mysis relicta (a freshwater shrimp), and the common and available prey fish of lake trout that we refer to as "pelagic forage fish" (smelt, cisco, whitefish, alewife, sculpins, nine-spine stickleback, and troutperch).
The image of "Mother Gin" very closely resembles that of the despised alewife of the 16th and 17th centuries.
For instance, we are allowed to retain sexist names for nonhumans, such as alewife, timothy grass, daddy longlegs, sweet william, and myrtle.