alewife

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alewife:

see herringherring,
common name for members of the large, widely distributed family Clupeidae, comprising many species of marine and freshwater food fishes, including the sardine (Sardinia), the menhaden (Brevoortia and Ethmidium), and the shad (Alosa).
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alewife

[′āl‚wīf]
(vertebrate zoology)
Pomolobus pseudoharengus. A food fish of the herring family that is very abundant on the Atlantic coast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Characterizing contemporary and historic age structure of alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) in Massachusetts spawning runs: final report, 110 p.
Alewives have sleek, slender bodies that are built for speed and quick movements through rapids, they are not equipped for jumping and have difficulty surpassing even a one- to two-foot obstruction.
(22.) The Alewives Invitation to Married-Men, and Batchelors ([London]: P.
The findings provided a scientifically supported explanation that natural conditions, not a resurgence of alewives, were to blame for the decline of the bass population in Spednic Lake.
Biologist Barbara Brennessel first saw alewives and blueback herrings during their migration upstream on a hiking trip.
WALLEYE CONNECTION: Dense schools of alewives are a major food source for large predators such as walleyes, trout, and salmon, and an abundance of alewives can make it tough for anglers to compete.
And according to ye manner of the Indians we manured our ground with herrings, or rather shads (or rather, alewives), which we have in great abundance and take with great ease at our door.
Traveling south, anglers venture through a culvert into South Pond, with 142 acres of sandy shorelines and a variety of vegetation holding the lakes' main forage of crawfish and alewives.
Haymes and Patrick (1986) excluded alewives from water intakes using low-frequency sounds.
The state approved the moratorium in response to several years of a steadily declining stock of alewives and blueback herring.
(1) While admitting that from the 1590s alehouses run by alewives faced increasing competition from breweries, Brown uncovers a far greater participation of women in this site of popular recreation than has been noted hitherto.
By the 1960s, alewives had become so plentiful that they began dying off by the billions, polluting beaches with tons of rotting fish.