algae bloom

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algae bloom

[′al·jē ‚blüm]
(ecology)
A heavy growth of algae in and on a body of water as a result of high phosphate concentration from farm fertilizers and detergents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Residents in the area also hope the rains would come soon-to wash away not only the algal bloom, but the worries of the vendors and fishermen, as well.
I think I could write a paper just about harmful algal blooms hitting social media!
The company expects further delay in reverting to full operations as proliferation of Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) is continuing, which is likely to increase the financial impact of the outbreak.
According to international water treatment and purification firm Lenntech, phosphates in detergents lead to freshwater algal blooms. It said that algae releases toxins and, when they decompose, they use up the oxygen available for aquatic life.
Kinmen County Waterworks Section Chief Chen Ching-hwa told CNA that grape algal blooms are very normal, harmless, and simply more obvious when the weather turns warm.
The algal bloom is the result of climate change and ensuing rise in seawater temperature.
United States based National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Noaa), a global authority on marine biology, said that red tide or "harmful algal blooms, HABs, occur when colonies of algae-simple plants that live in the sea and freshwater-grow out of control while producing toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals, and birds.
An algal bloom in Florida put the state in emergency back in July.
The revelation about the size of the dead zone in 2012 comes on the heels of the record-setting harmful algal bloom that occurred in 2011, and the closure of the Toledo water supply in August 2014 due to high concentrations of Cyanobacteria-produced toxins at the city's water intake.
NEARLY 1,800 people will be without water due to an algal bloom until Friday at the earliest.
OHIO (CyHAN)- Engineers at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland are using NASA Glenn remote-sensing technology to learn more about the Lake Erie algal bloom that contaminated water supplies in northwestern Ohio and southeastern Michigan over the weekend.