alienable

(redirected from alienability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

alienable

Law (of property) transferable to another owner
References in periodicals archive ?
While it can be compellingly argued that it is a form of personal property, its intangible nature makes it hard to consistently apply simple rules to its use and alienability.
When the competing interests of free alienability of property and transfer tax impact minimization collide, trustors and beneficiaries are looking to states like South Dakota to find a trust governance solution.
50) The categories or labels persist despite the functional closeness of some interests as a result of changes in the rules governing alienability and destruction.
See Walter Wheeler Cook, The Alienability of Choses in Action, 29 HARV.
4th DCA 2007) (addressing the public policy in favor of a short statute of limitations which promotes alienability of real property).
114) Finally, property rights had evolved to include what are now common facets: alienability and inheritability.
as one of a number of restrictions on alienability within property law,
23) This is a reference to Marx's observations on the alienability of money: "Since every commodity disappears when it becomes money it is impossible to tell from the money itself how it got into the hands of its possessor, or what article has been changed into it.
Systems of land tenure based on exclusive usage, fixed boundaries, registration of title deeds, alienability and permanent settlement were completely foreign to hunter-gatherer world views and effectively excluded them from legal ownership of vital resources.
215) The SBA's one year redemption period after a foreclosure sale is one default procedure that restricts the alienability of collateral because it is a cloud on title that limits the marketability of the property.
Normalizing prostitution versus normalizing the alienability of sexual rights: a response to Scott A.
I began to interrogate what gets animated and what doesn't; I began to worry about the line between human and subhuman in an era when the limits of incarceration, torture, human trafficking, medical experimentation, and the right to due process often turn on newly minted meanings of words like corporate personhood, enemy combatant, market force, IQ, underclass, genocide, genes, gender, torture, race, hunger, home, and alienability.