alive

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alive

[ə′līv]
(electricity)
(mining engineering)
That portion of a lode that is productive.

live

1. Connected to a source of voltage.
2. Said of a room having an unusually small amount of sound absorption.

Alive

account of cannibalism among air crash survivors. [Am. Lit.: Alive]

Alive

story of the survivors of plane crash in the Andes. [Am. Lit.: Alive]
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, it was stated that the perception of aliveness followed up a row in the form of "human-animal-plant" [24].
He realises that the picture, like his recent dreams, whilst it captures an excited and vibrant aliveness, yet brings to his mind this shadow knowledge of death, absence, loss.
The re-creation of the dense patterns made by foliage--and the sense of aliveness that these patterns suggest--may have been built on a foundation of ideas, but the blueprints were certain inescapable patterns in human consciousness.
The aliveness check means that, as far as the international team of scientists is concerned, ChemCam can begin its next task of transmitting photographic images of the rover as a system check.
If you have not yet read any phenomenological research or are perhaps sceptical of its value in 'serious' academic circles, or worry about the usefulness of the findings from such studies, you could become both surprised and 'hooked-in' by the freshness and aliveness by reading this important contribution to the development of midwifery research.
When a physical activity requires your full attention, it brings you a deep sense of peace and aliveness.
It is unfair, outrageous and just plain stupid," Curt Ellis, former director of The Aliveness Project of Northwest Indiana,(http://posttrib.
That's how we feel alive, and this aliveness carries us to the future.
Alive and creating: the mediating role of vitality and aliveness in the relationship between psychological safety and creative work involvement.
Again, there is no way to know--short of archival analysis of old home movies or interviewing adults, whose memories of their childhood emotional life may be compromised by years of distance--whether this idea of various states of aliveness is new.
An early start can "make you feel the exhilaration of your own aliveness," Sloan says.