alkene


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alkene

(ăl`kēn), any of a group of aliphatic hydrocarbons whose molecules contain one or more carbon-carbon double bonds (see chemical bondchemical bond,
mechanism whereby atoms combine to form molecules. There is a chemical bond between two atoms or groups of atoms when the forces acting between them are strong enough to lead to the formation of an aggregate with sufficient stability to be regarded as an
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). Alkenes with only one double bond have the general formula CnH2n. In the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) system of chemical nomenclature, the name of an alkene is derived from the name of the corresponding alkanealkane
, any of a group of aliphatic hydrocarbons whose molecules contain only single bonds (see chemical bond). Alkanes have the general chemical formula CnH2n+2.
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 by replacing the -ane alkane suffix with -ene and, if necessary, adding a prefix to indicate the location of the double bond in the molecule. The IUPAC name of the simplest alkene, H2C=CH2, is ethene, which is derived from ethane. Propene is related to propane. Two alkenes, 1-butene and 2-butene, are related to butane; these two compounds, which differ in the location of the double bond in their molecules, are structural isomersisomer
, in chemistry, one of two or more compounds having the same molecular formula but different structures (arrangements of atoms in the molecule). Isomerism is the occurrence of such compounds. Isomerism was first recognized by J. J. Berzelius in 1827.
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. In addition to these IUPAC names, many of the alkenes have common names, e.g., ethene is called ethylene and propene propylene. The alkenes as a group are sometimes called the ethylene series. Since the carbon-carbon double bond is sometimes called an olefinic linkage, the alkenes are sometimes called the olefins. Many of the reactions in which alkenes take part involve the cleavage of half the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent formation of two single bonds, one to each of the adjacent carbon atoms. Such reactions include hydrogenation, with the formation of an alkane, and hydration, with the formation of an alcohol.
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alkene

[′al‚kēn]
(organic chemistry)
One of a class of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons containing one or more carbon-to-carbon double bonds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

alkene

a. any unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbon with the general formula CnH2n
b. (as modifier): alkene series
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The cyclic oligomers of the desired polycycloaliphatichydrosilxane (5 g), the preferred cyclo- alkene (15 g), and Karstedt's catalyst (0.1 mL, 0.22 mmol) were added to a single-neck, round-bottom flask equipped with a reflux condenser.
patented a copolymer of alkenes and maleic anhydride, which is effective in producing a stable and clear aqueous fuel emulsion [52].
The alkenes to alkanes ratio in pyrolytic gases has been used to study the reaction mechanisms and reflects the pyrolysis conditions [5, 22].
Prilezhaev epoxidation of alkenes with a peroxy acid is the most common method used in research laboratories and industries nowadays [9,10].
Lower skewness values calculated for alkenes in relation to alkanes point out to the lower number of anomalous values of their concentrations.
Thermal pyrolysis included the pyrolysis of six-ring esters and pyrolysis of long carbon chain of ester groups, resulting in formation of acid, alkene, and various reactive intermediates.
Alkanes reached the highest value at 80[degrees]C, but alkenes and aldehydes and ketones reached their highest values at 60[degrees]C and 23[degrees]C, respectively.
The products were characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, and Mass Spectrometry (MS) that strongly approved the (Z)-double bond configuration of produced alkenes.
Having learned about these major pitfalls, the remaining major task was to find some satisfactory chiral zirconocene catalysts with sufficiently, but not excessively, bulky ligands to suppress unwanted side reactions, while promoting the desired alkene carbometalation.
Polarity order of functional groups is given as follows: amide > carboxylic acid > hydroxyl > ketone ~ aldehyde > amine > ester > ether > alkene > alkane [14].
The Sirrus brand mark is a graphic representation of the 1,1-disubstituted alkene molecule.
Sirrus' 1,1-disubstituted alkene monomer technology, and the combination of properties it enables, is now being made available for sampling to industrial manufacturing and assembly partners.