contact dermatitis

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Related to Allergic contact dermatitis: Irritant contact dermatitis

contact dermatitis

[′kän‚takt dər·mə′tīd·əs]
(medicine)
An acute or chronic inflammation of the skin resulting from irritation by or sensitization to some substance coming in contact with the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Occupational irritant and allergic contact dermatitis among health care workers.
Evaluation and pattern of nickel dermatitis in patients with allergic contact dermatitis (dissertation for fellowship).
(2015) [15] analyzed data of all employed patients patch-tested between 2003 and 2013 in the German Departments of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology and established by means of the significantly increased prevalence ratio (PR) (indicating risk) for: thiuram-mix, mercapto-mix, zinkdiethyldithiocarbamate, mercapto-benzothiazole (MBT), mercapto-mix without MBT, and epoxy-resin, being the predominant occupational allergens at least associated with a doubled risk (PR [greater than or equal to] 2) for acquiring occupationally allergic contact dermatitis.
Coenraads, "Occupational allergic contact dermatitis and patch test results of leather workers at two Indonesian tanneries," Contact Dermatitis, vol.
Allergic contact dermatitis associated with the use of Interlandi headgear in a patient with a history of atopy.
Differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis * Seborrhoeic dermatitis * Discoid (nummular) dermatitis * Irritant contact dermatitis (especially of the hands) * Allergic contact dermatitis and airborne contact dermatitis * Photo-allergic and photo-irritant dermatitis * 'HIV dermatitis' * Drug-induced dermatitis * Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma * Psoriasis, especially the erythrodermic type * Scabies * Insect bites * Filariasis Table 3.
In cases of recalcitrant dermatitis of the hands or perioral or perianal regions, allergic contact dermatitis to MI or other preservatives in seemingly innocuous personal care products must be considered as a possible causative factor.
"PPD is implicated in allergic contact dermatitis, but also in immediate hypersensitivity reactions, and it has been implicated as a possible risk factor for a number of cancers," he added.
I went to the nearest ER and lo and behold I was told I have acute allergic contact dermatitis. Now when I use store-bought shampoo, dish soap, hand soap, laundry soap, etc., and when I eat citrus, tomatoes, pork, dairy products, or caffeine (the list goes on), and use any chemical manmade products, just my hands blister.