allicin


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allicin

[′al·ə·sən]
(materials)
An oily liquid extracted from garlic which has a sharp garlic odor; used in medicine as an antibacterial agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
When using fresh garlic cloves, the method of preparation affects the amount of allicin compounds available after consumption (Banerjee et al.
The allicin present in garlic helps moderately lower our blood triglycerides and total cholesterol.
Recent studies have shown that allicin treatment reduces systemic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats and protects against coronary endothelial dysfunction and right heart hypertrophy in hypertensive rats [12,13].
A sulfur-based compound known as allicin gives garlic its health benefits and its pungent smell.
Allicin and other sulphur compounds are thought to be the major antimicrobial factors in garlic.
Garlic also contains allicin, which promotes antioxidant activity and has powerful antibacterial and antiviral functions.
3 GARLIC contains allicin, an active compound responsible for antibacterial properties, released when chopped or crushed.
This study was conducted to explore the genetic variation of allicin content among Chinese and Egyptian garlic germplasm the role of genetic improvement in allicin content enhancement and the combined influence of genetic and environmental factors on allicin contents in Egyptian garlic germplasm grown in Egypt and China respectively.
A compound called allicin provides most of the health benefits of garlic.
Heating immediately after crushing or mincing eliminates the formation of allicin.
This veg family supplies us with allicin which helps to stop viruses in their tracks.
It might sound a little unlikely, but there was (some) logic to it: onions contain allicin, a compound, also found in garlic, with infection-fighting qualities, and sulphur, which is believed to boost immune response.