alliteration

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alliteration

(əlĭt'ərā`shən), the repetition of the same starting sound in several words of a sentence. Probably the most powerful rhythmic and thematic uses of alliteration are contained in Beowulf, written in Anglo-Saxon and one of the earliest English poems extant. For example:
Ða com of more under mist-hleopum
Grendel gongan; Godes yrre baer …
(Then came from the moor, under the misty hills,
Grendel stalking; the God's anger bare).
Beowulf, Book XI
The poet was drawing here on an even older Germanic tradition, just as he was setting a high standard for other poets in Anglo-Saxon, who produced such alliterative works as Widsith, Deor's Lament, The Wanderer, The Seafarer, and The Ruin. Although the tradition lay dormant for centuries, an alliterative revival occurred in England in the mid-1400s, as evidenced by such masterworks as Piers Plowman and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (see Langland, WilliamLangland, William,
c.1332–c.1400, putative author of Piers Plowman. He was born probably at Ledbury near the Welsh marshes and may have gone to school at Great Malvern Priory. Although he took minor orders he never became a priest.
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; Pearl, ThePearl, The,
one of four Middle English alliterative poems, all contained in a manuscript of c.1400, composed in the West Midland dialect, almost certainly by the same anonymous author, who flourished c.1370–1390.
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). Shakespeare parodies alliteration in Peter Quince's Prologue in A Midsummer Night's Dream:
Whereat, with blade, with bloody blameful blade,
He bravely breach'd his boiling bloody breast.
Modern poets have continually renewed the possibilities of alliteration, e.g., Gerard Manley Hopkins's "Pied Beauty":
Glory be to God for dappled things …
Landscapes plotted and pieced—fold, fallow and plough;
And áll trádes, their gear and tackle and trim.

alliteration

the use of the same consonant (consonantal alliteration) or of a vowel, not necessarily the same vowel (vocalic alliteration), at the beginning of each word or each stressed syllable in a line of verse, as in around the rock the ragged rascal ran
References in periodicals archive ?
Phyllis Moe (Heidelberg: Winter, 1977); for more on the Augustinian doctrine of toleration, see Narin van Court, "The Siege of Jerusalem and Recuperative Readings," 164-5; "The Siege of Jerusalem and Augustinian Historians," 227-48; Chism, Alliterative Revivals, 156-60.
Giles Cripplegate), printed the alliterative masterpiece in 1550 as a work prophetic of the Reformation in England.
Kooper, on Layamon, favours twelfth-century dates of composition for several poems, including incidentally The Owl and the Nightingale, preserved in late thirteenth-century manuscripts, as he subjects the development of early Middle English alliterative verse to stylistic and prosodic analysis.
The Devil's Crayon, from the first album, is impressive while the astounding and alliterative Brave Bulging Buoyant Clairvoyants is irresistible, a furiously-paced shriek of cocksure youth.
Ralph Hanna's edition of the alliterative romance, The Knightly Tale of Golagros and Gawane, made a timely appearance in 2008: this text is known only from a single source, a pamphlet (STC 11984) printed in Edinburgh in 1508, which is now bound with ten other small printed books in National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS 19.
In the Alliterative Morte Arthure, the forest is often depicted as an ideal place for ambushing one's enemy.
And the closest The Essential Batman Encyclopedia gets to poetry is the alliterative vigour of a good old boing
This is Carolyn Beck's second book with her sister Andrea Beck, following The Waiting Dog in 2003, and her alliterative, rhythmic verse is perfect for reading aloud.
The witty takes on hard-to-deal-with personality traits, humanized through alliterative names such as Gertrude Grudge, Bob Bossy, and Larry Lazy.
Hall studies Tolkien's use of alliterative meter in his poetry, both that embedded in The Lord of the Rings and published separately elsewhere.
The attempt to place Thomas in the Welsh bardic tradition because of his alliterative style largely fails since the poet himself disputed it.
Jack, who seems to be stuck in a time-warp for 1950s schoolboys, then got caught in some alliterative hell by going on to talk about warp and weft being woven into wour wolicies.