allometry

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Related to allometric: allometric growth

allometry

[ə′läm·ə·trē]
(biology)
The quantitative relation between a part and the whole or another part as the organism increases in size. Also known as heterauxesis; heterogony.
The quantitative relation between the size of a part and the whole or another part, in a series of related organisms that differ in size.
(mathematics)
A relation between two variables x and y that can be written in the form y = axn, where a and n are constants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allometric Models for tree volume and total above-ground biomass in a tropical humid forest in Costa Rica.
2012), in aquaculture, the weight is directly proportional to the cube of its length (6=3); this shows an isometric growth, therefore, if b < 3 the growth is negative allometric, while for value over 3, the allometric is positive.
y] are allometric constants and the subscripts C and P indicate consumer and producer parameters, respectively (Yodzis & Innes, 1992).
As a result, the earlier LWR study with negative allometric growth for some freshwater cyprinids (b=2.
compacted soil and more weeds prevalence adversely affected allometric traits of wheat (Shah and Khan, 2006; Shahzad et al.
Packard (2012) called the phenomenon "non-loglinear allometry" and pointed out that the confounding effects of transformations by logarithms are common to all applications of allometric methods.
Study of differences in peripheral muscle strength of lean versus obese women: an allometric approach.
The negative allometric relationship suggests that greater maternal body mass relates to mothers giving birth to proportionately smaller offspring, which is probably related to the increased metabolic and maternal requirements of larger mothers.
Only male form I and juveniles showed positive allometric rates of weight change with increasing length (Table 1).
Additional aspects include bioanalytical method development for Tox species and human (perhaps including key metabolites); documentation regarding toxicokinetics/exposure documentation (such as that involving safety pharmacology, genetic toxicology and repeated-dose toxicology)and human PK prediction (including bioavailability, allometric scaling and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK).
All the studies reviewed here strongly agree that airborne Lidar data provides the most accurate estimates of forest biomass, but rigorous procedures should be taken in selecting appropriate allometric equations to use as reference biomass estimates (Zhao, Guo, Kelly 2012).