allostasis


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allostasis

[‚al·ə′stā·səs]
(psychology)
The ongoing adaptive efforts of the body to maintain stability (homeostasis) in response to stressors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor reverses alcohol-induced allostasis of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system: implications for alcohol reward and seeking.
In chronic stress, the brain doesn't just temporarily adapt to change, it may structurally change in response to change, meeting the definition of allostasis.
Allostasis and Allostatic Load: Implications for Neuropsychopharmacology.
Sex, stress and the hippocampus: allostasis, allostatic load and the aging process.
Adverse childhood experiences, allostasis, allostatic load, and age-related disease.
According to Koob and LeMoal (1997) dsyregulation of the brain reward mechanism is induced by repeated drug abuse with subsequent allostasis, the ability to achieve stability through change.
Effects of yoga on the autonomic nervous system, gamma-aminobutyric-acid, and allostasis in epilepsy, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
This process of dynamic homeostasis has been termed allostasis, with the concept of allostatic load representing the cost of the cumulative correcting process.
This process can be d into three stages, including transient loading attenuated strain, and allostasis.
Allostasis and the human brain: integrating models of stress from the social and life sciences.
Allostasis denotes the body's capacity to adjust its set points (ideal calibration for optimal functioning) in an effort to maintain homeostasis (McEwen, 2000; Sterling & Eyer, 1988).