allostatic load


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allostatic load

[‚al·ə¦stad·ik ′lōd]
(psychology)
The physiological wear and tear on the body that results from ongoing adaptive efforts to maintain stability (homeostasis) in response to stressors.
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But because curcumin can protect BDNF levels and reduce symptoms of depression, it may help individuals overcome the fatigue, anxiety, pain, and overwhelming emotions so commonly experienced due to an allostatic load that feels unworkable.
A prospective cohort of 1116 eligible participants aged 35 to 75 years who were unemployed during 2009- 2010 from the UK Household Longitudinal Study were followed up at waves in 2010-2011 and in 2011-2012 for allostatic load biomarkers and self-reported health.
This process of dynamic homeostasis has been termed allostasis, with the concept of allostatic load representing the cost of the cumulative correcting process.
Furthermore, as has been documented repeatedly in the many papers being written on allostatic load, if this response goes on too long, it can play as big a role in creating chronic sickness as the original environmental stressor, and sometimes more so.
Allostatic load refers to physiological wear and tear resulting from prolonged dysregulation of allostatic mediators in response to chronic stimulation (McEwen & Gianaros, 2011).
Allostatic load is a physiological marker of chronic stress and higher loads are associated with cognitive decline, increased frailty, poorer self-rated health, immobility, depressive symptoms, and chronic conditions (Beckie 2012; Juster, McEwen, and Lupien 2010).
It's possible that too much cognitive deterioration experienced in older age is the cumulative effect of years of allostatic load.
The concepts of allostasis and allostatic load consider the influence stress has on normal body performance (McEwen, 2000).
Allostatic load is "the wear and tear that results from chronic overactivity or underactivity of allostatic systems.
Infants and children are more vulnerable to the effects of chronic stress because the brain structures associated with stress regulation (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic nervous system, limbic system) are still developing and thus susceptible to allostatic load.
Cumulative risk, maternal responsiveness and allostatic load among young adolescents.