allostatic load


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allostatic load

[‚al·ə¦stad·ik ′lōd]
(psychology)
The physiological wear and tear on the body that results from ongoing adaptive efforts to maintain stability (homeostasis) in response to stressors.
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Although no single biomarker is appropriate for all applications (Brunner 2007), suites of physiologic parameters have been developed to represent allostatic load in humans, including indicators of cardiovascular function, metabolism, cholesterol, glucose metabolism, HPA-axis function, and sympathetic nervous system activity (Kubzansky et al.
Chronic stress is defined as a pernicious state resulting from persistent demands of the environment or an event or experience perceived as threatening because it produced an allostatic load on the person's physical or psychological adaptive capacity and precipitated a sequential chain of physical, emotional or interpersonal difficulties (Bay, 2002).
They also examined allostatic load or the adaptive efforts, at age 43 based on 12 biological factors linked to cardiovascular regulation, body fat deposition, lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism, inflammation and neuroendocrine regulation.
Allostatic load may be a physiologic mechanism behind the moderation of the toxic effect of environmental pollutants by social stressors.
The findings support a model of disablement and allostatic load.
In addition to undergoing routine blood measures that assessed allostatic load, participants were instructed to collect saliva at home and during a laboratory paradigm.
Allostasis, allostatic load, and the aging nervous system: role of excitatory amino acids and excitotoxicity.
Allostatic load is "the wear and tear that results from chronic overactivity or underactivity of allostatic systems.
Infants and children are more vulnerable to the effects of chronic stress because the brain structures associated with stress regulation (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic nervous system, limbic system) are still developing and thus susceptible to allostatic load.
Previous research has shown that higher levels of allostatic load are associated with increased likelihood of a negative health event such as a heart attack or stroke, or show declines in physical or cognitive functioning.