almond

(redirected from almond tree)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

almond,

name for a small tree (Prunus amygdalus) of the family Rosaceae (roserose,
common name for some members of the Rosaceae, a large family of herbs, shrubs, and trees distributed over most of the earth, and for plants of the genus Rosa, the true roses.
..... Click the link for more information.
 family) and for the nutlike, edible seed of its drupe fruit. The "nuts" of sweet-almond varieties are eaten raw or roasted, are processed with water to produced almond milk, and are pressed to obtain almond oil. Bitter-almond varieties also yield oil, from which the poisonous prussic acid is removed in the extraction process. Almond oil is used for flavoring, in soaps and cosmetics, and medicinally as a demulcent. The tree, native to central Asia and perhaps the Mediterranean, is now cultivated principally in the Middle East, Italy, Spain, Greece, and (chiefly the sweet varieties) California, which now produces over 70% of the world crop. It closely resembles the peach, of which it may be an ancestor, except that the fruit is fleshless. The flowering almonds (e.g., P. triloba) are pink- to white-blossomed shrubs also native to central Asia; like the similar and closely related pink-blossomed almond, they are widely cultivated as ornamentals. Several Asian types are known as myrobalan, a name applied also to the cherry plum, with which flowering almonds are sometimes hybridized. The beauty of the almond in bud, blossom, and fruit gave motif to sacred and ornamental carving. In the Middle East the tree breaks into sudden bloom in January, and in some of the region it has come to symbolize beauty and revival. The rod of Aaron in the Bible (see Aaron's-rodAaron's-rod,
popular name for several tall-flowering, infrequently branching plants, such as goldenrod and mullein. The name is an allusion to the rod that Aaron placed before the ark and that miraculously blossomed and bore almonds.
..... Click the link for more information.
) bore almonds. Almonds are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Rosaceae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
Enlarge picture
almond

almond

Look like unripe small green pointy peaches- inside the fuzzy "peach" is a stone and inside the stone is the "almond" kernel. Almonds are not really a nut- they are a seed. You can live off almonds indefinitely. Almonds are highly nutritious, rich in almost all the elements needed by body. Almonds are one of the only alkaline nuts. They inhibit tumor cell growth, good source of vit E and magnesium, fiber, calcium, iron. The outer fleshy part is edible also- the best time is when the fruit is still young and the insides haven’t hardened yet.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

almond

[′ä·mənd]
(botany)
Prunus amygdalus. A small deciduous tree of the order Rosales; it produces a drupaceous edible fruit with an ellipsoidal, slightly compressed nutlike seed.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

almond

An aureole of elliptical form.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

almond

symbol of the Virgin Mary’s innocence. [O.T.: Numbers 17: 1–11; Art: Hall, 14]
See: Purity
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

almond

1. a small widely cultivated rosaceous tree, Prunus amygdalus, that is native to W Asia and has pink flowers and a green fruit containing an edible nutlike seed
2. 
a. a pale yellowish-brown colour
b. (as adjective): an almond shirt
3. 
a. yellowish-green colour
b. (as adjective)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
As ever, what really matters is what's on the plate, and here at the Almond Tree that along with the soft purr of happy people eating certainly makes the very best argument for itself.
The team first monitored four different amygdalin concentrations, resembling the natural levels of the toxin in almond tree nectar: 2.5-10 milligrams per liter.
If given the go-ahead, the plans for land at the Almond Tree Avenue junction would see 36 new homes built.
Galfar employees joined representatives from Ashghal to plant trees on the verdant grounds, including a banyan tree, neem tree, tropical almond tree, and mulberry tree.
Those living in the area described horrific scenes after the motorcyclist collided with a silver Ford Mondeo at the junction of Hall Green Road and Almond Tree Avenue in Alderman's Green at around 6.30pm.
The Indian almond tree is considered the largest tropical tree in the Leadwood tree family and is native to tropical Asia and northern Australia.
The almond, contrary to popular belief, is not a nut, but the seed of the almond tree, which is native to the Middle East, North Africa, and the Indian Subcontinent.
Fundamentally, almond tree yields are the product of the number of kernels produced per tree and kernel weights.
"This is also one reason that we chose the almond tree, which is compact and reaches a maximum height of 10 metres.
Technically, almonds are not nuts but the seeds of the fruit of the almond tree.
Almondbury High School pupils dressed an almond tree as part of GCSE art for Nation-al Tree Week, and some of those who took part were pictured, from top: Mark Robinson,
Results led the scientists to the conclusion that an almond tree can compensate for a lack of nutrients and water in the short term by directing stored nutrients and water to the fruits but cannot compensate for insufficient pollination.