alnico


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

alnico

[′al·ni‚kō]
(metallurgy)
One of a series of ferrous alloys containing aluminum, nickel, and cobalt, valued because of their highly retentive magnetic properties; usually designated with a roman-numeral number, such as alnico VII. Also known as aluminum-nickel-cobalt alloy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diffraction X-ray from the sample AlNiCo show three decagonal phases.
Firstly, in order to inherit the advantage of real-time changeable magnetization of PMs from the memory machine, the non-rare-earth PM material AlNiCo is adopted in the proposed axial-field MVG.
Blechman and Smiley demonstrated the use of Alnico magnets for canine distalisation in two cats (17).
When the price of cobalt started to rise in the late 1960s, manufacturers began searching for an alternative to Alnico. For many, ceramic was the solution.
- Permanent Magnet Market, By Types (NdFeB, Ferrite, SmCo, Alnico), End User Industry (Consumer Electronics, General Industrial, Automotive, Medical Technology, Environment & Energy, Aerospace & Defense, Others) & Geography - Trends & Forecast To 2018
These materials have significantly higher values of coercivity [H.sub.c] or residual remanence Br in comparison with traditional permanent magnets such as steel, AlNiCo or ferrites.
* Alnico: One of the earliest magnet materials used for ferrous separation, Alnico magnets are castings of aluminum, nickel, cobalt, and iron.
Erium[R] 3000 develops a magnetic field that has up to twenty-five times the magnetic pull of conventional ceramic (barium ferrite) or Alnico (aluminum-nickel-cobalt) magnet materials.
Since 1953 aluminium-nickel-cobalt (Alnico), platinum-cobalt and ferrite magnets were used in dentistry, These magnets offer high field strength at a reasonable cost.
Designed for water-based fluids, Series HFH incorporates a brass body, Viton seals and a TeflonOcoated Alnico magnet.
Relatively new magnetic materials such as Alnico (aluminum-nickel-cobalt) and neodymium rare earth alloys have increased the holding force of permanent-magnet chucks to the point where they're useful for a variety of chipmaking operations.