alpine glacier


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Related to alpine glacier: continental glacier

alpine glacier

[′al‚pīn ′glā·shər]
(hydrology)
A glacier lying on or occupying a depression in mountainous terrain. Also known as mountain glacier.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent research into 600 Alpine glaciers by Marie Gardent and her colleagues at the University of Savoie has shown that during the past 40 years, their combined area has shrunk by a quarter--from 375 square kilometres to 275 square kilometres.
Studies of alpine glaciers and ice caps in northern Canada indicate that most have been in retreat for several decades (Koerner, 1989).
Most Alpine glaciers will be gone by the end of this century, scientists say.
Alpine Glaciers Experience one of the world's greatest train journeys from Zermatt to St Moritz, on the Bernina and Glacier Express trip.
3D modelling with historic imagery to understand how the slopes above and around alpine glaciers are changing.
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, alpine glaciers around the globe have been in a state of "negative mass balance"--a condition in which melting exceeds snow accumulation--for 21 years.
Scientists say climate change is already visible in sea-level rise, loss of alpine glaciers and snow cover, shrinking Arctic summer sea ice, thawing permafrost, poleward migration of animals and plants and an increase in intense tropical cyclone activity in the North Atlantic.
Adding to this is what bothies are all about: a view of majestic mountain peaks piercing the blue sky, rugged and beautiful; a view of eerie Alpine glaciers spilling into the deep valleys below, and of steep rock faces rising and falling confidently alongside turquoise glacial rivers.
He says alpine glaciers are likely to lose most of their mass by 2100.
1830s -- Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz presents evidence of past changes in Alpine glaciers, pointing to ancient Ice Ages and showing that the climate has not always been stable.
After graduating from Oxford University in 1990 he took time off to travel around South-East Asia and when money ran out enrolled on a PhD course at Edinburgh University to study the response of Patagonian and Alpine glaciers to climate change.