alpine glacier


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Related to alpine glacier: continental glacier

alpine glacier

[′al‚pīn ′glā·shər]
(hydrology)
A glacier lying on or occupying a depression in mountainous terrain. Also known as mountain glacier.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Climatic and glaciological influences on suspended sediment transport from an alpine glacier. In: Peters, N.E., and Walling, D.E., eds.
Recent research into 600 Alpine glaciers by Marie Gardent and her colleagues at the University of Savoie has shown that during the past 40 years, their combined area has shrunk by a quarter--from 375 square kilometres to 275 square kilometres.
Studies of alpine glaciers and ice caps in northern Canada indicate that most have been in retreat for several decades (Koerner, 1989).
The Iceman Murder Mystery documentary examines Otzi, whose body was found preserved in an Alpine glacier in 1991.
In 1962 Siffre spent 63 days 350ft under an Alpine glacier. In 1972 he lived alone for 205 days in a deep cave in Texas.
No-one would argue that the 5,300-year-old `iceman', discovered by German tourists in an Alpine glacier in 1991 should have been left without scientists having an opportunity to examine the body.
Significant melting of alpine glaciers has occurred since the last significant exploration program over 20 years ago, particularly on the north and west sides of the Property.
New mineralized exposure from melting alpine glaciers, coupled with an improved understanding of the structural geological setting has helped refine the drill plan, including westerly oriented drill holes.
GENEVA, July 8 (KUNA) -- With unprecedented heatwave and record-breaking temperatures in Europe, many people have to wonder about relevant reflections on accumulated snow and Alpine glaciers. Due to snowmelt, there would be major environmental changes that could actually become a turning point in the history of humanity.
These changes are affecting us in many ways: 1) Weather is becoming extreme and unpredictable, 2) The number and intensity of natural disasters are increasing, 3) Continental and alpine glaciers are melting and becoming smaller.
Famiglietti noted that while water loss in some regions, like the melting ice sheets and alpine glaciers, is clearly driven by warming climate, it will require more time and data to determine the driving forces behind other patterns of freshwater change.