alsike clover


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alsike clover

[′al‚sik ′klō·ver]
(botany)
Trifolium hybridium. A species of clover with pink or white flowers that is grown for forage; native to Alsike, Sweden.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The only non-native forage species reduced by grazing was alsike clover. With greater mechanical resistance and less stable aggregates, the soil on the grazed rehabilitated landings was apparently less favorable to plant growth relative to treatments without cattle grazing.
A indicate that the acid-soil resistance, and by inference Al resistance, of these species can be characterized as: Crimson clover > arrowleaf clover [greater than or equal to] white clover > rose clover [greater than or equal to] alsike clover. Literature indicates that arrowleaf clover is less tolerant of acid soil (Hoveland et al., 1969) but is more susceptible to iron chlorosis (Gildersleeve and Ocumpaugh, 1988) than crimson clover.
Cumulative root emergence Soil pH Species Cultivar 4.35 4.60 5.20 % Crimson clover Mean 38.4A 79.0A 83.9A ([section]) ([paragraph]) Arrowleaf clover `Yuchi' 4.2B 46.2B 60.7B Rose clover `Over-R18' 3.5B 73.4A 87.7A White clover `Huia' 4.4B 31.0C 45.6C Alsike clover `Daubiji' 0.1a 23.1b 44.8a `Rausviaj' 0.3a 37.5a 50.9a Mean 0.2B 30.3C 47.9C Overall mean 15.97 56.03 67.68 Resistance Cumulative root index emergence ([dagger]) Soil pH Int.
Under some management and environmental conditions, alsike clover leaves resemble those of white clover, but alsike clover is not stoloniferous.
Analysis of molecular variance ([dagger]) of RAPD profiles for eight white clover populations and one alsike clover population.
Treatments included four freezing temperatures (-2, -4, -6, and -8C), four ages of growth [1-wk (hypocotyl arch), 2-wk (fully expanded cotyledons), 3-wk (first trifoliolate emerged), and 4-wk (second trifoliolate emerged) old seedlings], and 10 legume species ['Vernal' alfalfa, 'Arlington' red clover, yellow-flowered sweetclover, 'Aurora' alsike clover, white clover, 'Eski' sainfoin, 'Topaz' pinto bean, 'Upland' navy bean, 'Trail' soybean, and 'Trapper' field pea] commonly grown in the area.
Forage legumes (alfalfa, red clover, sweetclover, alsike clover, white clover, and sainfoin) were seeded from 10 to 20 mm deep and grain legumes (pinto bean, navy bean, soybean, and field pea) from 20 to 30 mm deep.
The L[T.sub.50] temperature of alfalfa, red clover, sweetclover, alsike clover, white clover, sainfoin (Onobrichis viciifolia Scop), soybean, field pea, and navy and pinto (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) beans were -7.0, -6.3, -6.8, -7.4, -7.1, -7.3, -4.6, -5.6, -3.5, and -3.3 [degrees] C, respectively.
Ten to 12 seeds for forage legumes (alfalfa, red clover, sweetclover, alsike clover, white clover, and sainfoin), and three to four seeds for grain legumes (soybean and field pea) were seeded at 15- to 20-mm and 20- to 25-mm depths, respectively.
Hur and Nelson (1985) compared the seedling growth of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), alsike clover (Trifolium hybridum L.), red clover (T.
Previous research at Minnesota showed that 1-yr-old stands of alfalfa, alsike clover (Trifolium hybridum L.), and birdsfoot trefoil had herbage yields of 12 166, 4400, and 8233 kg [ha.sup.-1], respectively; but Kura clover only yielded 5766 kg [ha.sup.-1] (Sheaffer and Marten, 1991).
The association of flowering habit with winter survival in red and alsike clover during the seedling year of growth.