altitude acclimatization


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altitude acclimatization

[′al·tə‚tüd ə‚klī·məd·ə′zā·shən]
(physiology)
A physiological adaptation to reduced atmospheric and oxygen pressure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Altitude acclimatization might be useful to enable the achievement of maximum performance and prevent AMS in hypoxic conditions (5,18,25).
"Living high-training low": effect of moderate altitude acclimatization with low altitude training on performance.
Adaptations in ventilatory regulation (ventilatory acclimatization) play an important role in the complex altitude acclimatization process leading to a progressive increase in ventilation and arterial oxygen saturation (Sa[0.sub.2]) within the first hours to days during an acute continuous hypoxic exposure (5).
Using this method, athletes live at moderate altitude (2,500 m) and train at low altitude (1,250 m) which allows athletes to obtain the benefits of altitude acclimatization and continue to train at high intensities, resulting in improvements of aerobic capacity ([VO.sub.2]max), ventilatory threshold (VT) and performance at sea level (Chapman et al., 1998; Levine and Stray-Gundersen, 1997; Levine et al., 1991; Mattila and Rusko, 1996; Roberts et al., 2003; Rusko et al., 1999).
Indeed a different composition in membrane lipids (12), a higher concentration of intracellular ATP (10), and a partial fragmentation of actin (13), have been observed in a fraction of red cells populations from mountain climbers after high altitude acclimatization and return to sea level.
Altitude acclimatization and energy metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle during exercise.
(2000) Increases in submaximal cycling efficiency mediated by altitude acclimatization. Journal of Applied Physiology 89, 1189-1197.
Whereas the optimal organization of altitude training to optimize performance at sea level is heavily discussed in the scientific community, the benefit of altitude acclimatization (about 1 to 2 weeks) for competitions at moderate altitudes above 2,000 m is well established (2).
The potential benefit of classic altitude training is that altitude acclimatization provides the stimulus for both central and peripheral adaptations, as well as an additional training load compared to sea level (Bartsch and Saltin, 2008).
train at higher intensities) due to adaptations from altitude acclimatization.
The average HR per watt decreased after simulated altitude acclimatization via rebreathing, or, the efficiency of HR was improved in the TRT group.
Why is V[O.sub.2]max after altitude acclimatization still reduced despite normalization of arterial O2 content?