alum shale

alum shale

[′al·əm ‚shāl]
(petrology)
A shale containing pyrite that is decomposed by weathering to form sulfuric acid, which acts on potash and alumina constituents to form alum. Also known as alum schist; alum slate.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bituminous alum shale has occurs possible Carboniferous age near Shahidmena in Khyber Agency, in Jatta and in a gorge near Dozha Banda in Kohat area.
These are typically replaced by bituminous shale and limestone upwards, the well-known Alum Shale (e.g., Andersson et al.
scandinavian alum shale," Marine and Petroleum Geology, vol.
On a regional scale, graptolite argillite belongs to the wide but patchy belt of Middle Cambrian to Lower Ordovician black shales extending from Lake Onega district in the east across Sweden (alum shale as a local name in Scandinavia) to the Caledonian front, Oslo region and Jutland Peninsula in the west.
Part I covers the era of unprecedented growth, between 1600 and the Glorious Revolution in 1689, when the port of Whitby expanded from a primary focus on the trade in alum shale necessary for woollen production to ship-building and the northeastern coal trade.
As part of the talk we were told of a Loftus man, Louis Hunton, son of a quarry manager, who discovered the significance of layers or zones of ammonite fossils, dug out with tons of alum shale, and presented a paper to The Royal Society.
Efforts to understand the role of the soil solid-phase in controlling TE availability is exemplified by the results of Emilie Gerard, Guillaume Echevarria, Christian Morel, Thibault Sterckeman, and Jean Louis Morel who reported on the kinetics of isotopic exchange of Cd in soils; the study of potential Cd and Zn mobility in an alum shale soil (Asgeir Almas and Bal Ram Singh); solid-phase speciation Cd, Ni, and Zn in contaminated and non-contaminated tropical soils (Abul Kashem and Bal Ram Singh); and the role of dissolved and sorbed organic carbon on Mo retention by iron oxides (Friederike Lang and Martin Kaupenjohann).
Uranium enrichment shorewards in black shales: a case study from the Scandinavian Alum Shale. GFF, 124, 107-115.
The occurrence of Middle Cambrian to Late Ordovician organic-rich black shale deposits in an extensive area of Sweden (alum shale [1]), the Oslo region [2], Bornholm [3], Estonia (known as graptolite argillite, "Dictyonema shale" [4], and kukersite as proper oil shale), Poland [5] and NorthWest Russia [6] has been known for a long time.
There are numerous studies conducted on various metalliferous black shale/oil shale deposits worldwide--black shale deposits in North America [7-12], China [13, 14], central Europe [15], and alum shale in Scandinavia [3, 16-20]--focusing on the general characteristics and different aspects of metallogenesis in those assemblages.