alum shale

alum shale

[′al·əm ‚shāl]
(petrology)
A shale containing pyrite that is decomposed by weathering to form sulfuric acid, which acts on potash and alumina constituents to form alum. Also known as alum schist; alum slate.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Uranium enrichment shorewards in black shales: a case study from the Scandinavian Alum Shale.
Part I covers the era of unprecedented growth, between 1600 and the Glorious Revolution in 1689, when the port of Whitby expanded from a primary focus on the trade in alum shale necessary for woollen production to ship-building and the northeastern coal trade.
As part of the talk we were told of a Loftus man, Louis Hunton, son of a quarry manager, who discovered the significance of layers or zones of ammonite fossils, dug out with tons of alum shale, and presented a paper to The Royal Society.
Efforts to understand the role of the soil solid-phase in controlling TE availability is exemplified by the results of Emilie Gerard, Guillaume Echevarria, Christian Morel, Thibault Sterckeman, and Jean Louis Morel who reported on the kinetics of isotopic exchange of Cd in soils; the study of potential Cd and Zn mobility in an alum shale soil (Asgeir Almas and Bal Ram Singh); solid-phase speciation Cd, Ni, and Zn in contaminated and non-contaminated tropical soils (Abul Kashem and Bal Ram Singh); and the role of dissolved and sorbed organic carbon on Mo retention by iron oxides (Friederike Lang and Martin Kaupenjohann).
The licences are underlain by the thinly overburden covered Alum Shale Formation, which has a maximum thickness of 180 metres in this area, and extends for 10s of kilometres in all directions.
Alum shale and graptolite argillite form patches over extensive areas in the outskirts of the Baltica palaeocontinent [1].
900 mA, remove alum shale and lay new foundations, excavate and cast under the existing foundation walls.
Large-scale utilization of the Dictyonema shale as well as of the Alum Shale of Sweden has so many negative sides listed among the above potential environmental restrictions and concerns that the inclusion of such resources in world OS potential is completely misleading.
The SGU drilled 28 vertical diamond drill holes in an area of approximately 250 square kilometres and analysed the alum shale cores for molybdenum, vanadium, uranium and organic carbon ("Corg").
There are numerous studies conducted on various metalliferous black shale/oil shale deposits worldwide--black shale deposits in North America [7-12], China [13, 14], central Europe [15], and alum shale in Scandinavia [3, 16-20]--focusing on the general characteristics and different aspects of metallogenesis in those assemblages.
On the outcrops of alum shale (Dictyonema argillite, Dictyonema "shale"), radon emissions are sporadically dangerous.
In the update to Economic Scoping Study [6] it is mentioned that alum shale metallurgy is very complex and does not respond well to preconcentration processes such as flotation.