crest

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crest,

in feudal livery, an ornament of the headpiece that afforded protection against a blow. The term is incorrectly used to mean family coat of arms. Crests were widely used in the 13th cent. by feudal chiefs, as they had been by ancient Greek warriors and the Roman centurions. The earlier forms were usually of stuffed leather, gilded, silvered, or painted; later they were of wood or metal. The crest came to be used in heraldryheraldry,
system in which inherited symbols, or devices, called charges are displayed on a shield, or escutcheon, for the purpose of identifying individuals or families.
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, first only by persons of high rank, then by all those entitled to a coat of arms. It surmounts the escutcheon; its colors are those of the coat of arms. The dragon, wivern, and plume of feathers are common crests. The lion, used by Edward III of England, remains the crest of the English sovereigns. See also blazonryblazonry
, science of describing or depicting armorial bearings. The introduction, since the Middle Ages, of artificial rules and fanciful medieval terms has complicated the science, particularly in England.
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Crest

Ornament on a roof, a roof screen or wall, which is frequently perforated, and consists of rhythmic and identical decorative patterns.

Crest

 

(1) A bony protrusion in vertebrates and man that increases the area for muscle attachment. For example, the skulls of many mammals have, on the occipital and parietal bones, crests whose size depends upon the degree of development of the attached musculature. The sternum of flying birds has a high thin crest called the carina, to which the pectoral muscles, which draw the wings downward, are attached.

(2) A fleshy growth (in English, also called the comb) at the top of the head in some birds (many gallinaceans and accipi-ters, such as the American black vulture). In breeds of domestic fowl the crest takes a variety of forms (foliate, rosaceous, or nutlike). Varieties of chicken with well-developed tufts usually have no comb (for example, the Dutch and Padua hens).

crest

[krest]
(design engineering)
The top of a screw thread.
(science and technology)
The highest point of a structure or natural formation, such as the top edge of a dam, the ridge of a roof, the highest point of a gravity wave, or the highest natural projection of a hill or mountain.

crest

crest, 2
1. A finial.
2. An ornament of a roof, a roof screen, wall, or aedicula, generally rhythmic and highly decorative, and frequently perforated; cresting.

crest

1. a tuft or growth of feathers, fur, or skin along the top of the heads of some birds, reptiles, and other animals
2. a ridge on the neck of a horse, dog, lion, etc.
3. the mane or hair growing from this ridge
4. a ridge along the surface of a bone
5. Archery identifying rings painted around an arrow shaft
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding the altered frenulum, they were more frequent with fixation between the middle third and the apex and visible from the inferior alveolar crest, the thin thickness was the most observed in both cases.
Measurements of the following parameters were performed based on the 3D-CT images: the width and the thickness of zygoma (Figure 5), the width of the alveolar crest of the implant starting point, the angle between the line crossing the bilateral infraorbital foramen (LBIF) and IA ([angle][alpha]), the distribution of the crossing points of IA extension line and the zygomatic surface (Figure 5), the position of the zygomatic implant and the maxillary sinus (Figure 6), the position of the zygomatic implant and the zygomatic nerve, and the distance between the starting point and the endpoint of the zygomatic implant (Figure 6).
Evidence of alveolar crest resorption in the premolar and first molar regions must be minimal or absent.
Insufficient width of alveolar crest has led to the application of different grafting techniques.
A and B were calculated for only the edentulous alveolar crest.
The reexamination 6 months later showed that conventional management of AP fractures resulted in 65% post-traumatic deformity of the alveolar crest, complicating subsequent prosthetics.
For degree of osseous deformities in the alveolar bone inferior to the alveolar crest, the evaluation question asked, "Does the enclosed radiograph show evidence of osseous deformities unrelated to periodontal disease as evidenced by radiolucent areas in the alveolar bone, apical to the most coronal portion of the alveolar bone?" The periodontist rated each radiograph as no bone loss or abnormalities observed, minimal evidence to support bone defects apical to coronal bone, moderate evidence to support bone defects apical to coronal bone, or definite evidence to support bone defects apical to coronal bone.
Adjust the sagittal plane, the coronal plane and the cross section so that the horizontal observation line and the vertical observation line pass through the alveolar crest and divide the apical area (Fig.1).
short wide and square 1996 Kois (2) * Based on the relationship between alveolar crest and CEJ * He said that clinical outcomes are strongly related to the gingival or alveolar crest form.
A horizontal incision at the top of the alveolar crest was followed by vertical incisions for tissue release.
In the alveolar crest of the lower left teeth 18 and 19, a 10 x 11 mm protrusion was accompanied by the exposure of bone approximately 3 mm in diameter, gingival swelling, and discharge of pus (Figure 2).
Clinical and radiographic examination revealed that the fracture margin was situated subgingivally and extended almost to the alveolar crest on the palatal aspect.