duct

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Related to alveolar duct: alveolar sac

duct

1. any bodily passage, esp one conveying secretions or excretions
2. a narrow tubular cavity in plants, often containing resin or some other substance
3. a channel or pipe carrying electric cable or wires

Duct

A nonmetallic or metallic tube for housing wires or cables, may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs; a duct usually fabricated of metal, used to transfer air from one location to another.

duct

[dəkt]
(anatomy)
An enclosed tubular channel for conducting a glandular secretion or other body fluid.
(communications)
An enclosed runway for cables.
(geophysics)
The space between two air layers, or between an air layer and the earth's surface, in which microwave beams are trapped in ducting. Also known as radio duct; tropospheric duct.
(mechanical engineering)
A fluid flow passage which may range from a few inches in diameter to many feet in rectangular cross section, usually constructed of galvanized steel, aluminum, or copper, through which air flows in a ventilation system or to a compressor, supercharger, or other equipment at speeds ranging to thousands of feet per minute.

duct

1. ,See air duct.
2. In electric systems, a metallic or nonmetallic tube, (usually circular, oval, rectangular, or octagonal) for housing wires or cables; may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs.

duct

A thin-wall tube installed in aircraft air-conditioning and heating systems to carry heated or cooled air for distribution to various aircraft locations.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, there was also an appreciable fraction of particles that deposited in the alveolar duct (8.9%) and the canals of the pores (1.4%), as shown in Figure 6(a).
(36,37) Diffuse alveolar damage may contain organizing fibroblastic tissue within alveolar ducts in particular, but this is not the dominant finding, and OP lacks the hyaline membranes or acute DAD and does not show the prominent interstitial myxoid fibrosis or prominent type 2 pneumocyte hyperplasia of the organizing phase of DAD.
Abbreviations: a, alveolus; AD, alveolar ducts; BV, blood vessel; TB, terminal bronchioles.
(1999) demonstrated that inhalation of urban dust at concentrations that cause few lung effects when inhaled alone can potentiate [O.sub.3] toxicity, particularly in the vicinity of the alveolar duct where interstitial inflammatory cells accumulate, the anatomical target of air pollutants in both children and dogs residing in Mexico City (Calderon-Garciduenas et al.
In the three groups of rats, approximately 81-85% of the particulate material was located in alveolar and alveolar duct lumens either within macrophages or extracellularly.
They further divide into respiratory bronchioles, ending in alveolar ducts. Respiratory bronchioles have occassional alveoli budding from their walls, while alveolar ducts are completely lined with alveoli.
Off the secondary bronchi, bronchioles divide into even smaller units called alveolar ducts. Alveoli are groups of microscopic air sacs that extend off the end of the alveolar ducts.
Thus, the acinus cannot be identified on a normal gross specimen but would require a 3-dimensional process to visualize the conelike arrangement of 3 generations of respiratory bronchioles with their branches of alveolar ducts, alveolar saccules, and alveoli.
Sometimes there is accompanying mild fibrosis of the walls of the respiratory bronchiole, more distal alveolar ducts, or surrounding alveolar walls, although historically the question of how much fibrosis has been allowed in RB as opposed to RBILD is poorly defined and certainly confused (see below).
For each emission wavelength, we photographed five images from the proximal alveolar region, which are alveoli located near the first alveolar ducts from the terminal bronchioles, the alveolar region most affected by particle deposition.
The last case of anti-KS disease demonstrated an OP pattern, with young granulation tissue plugs filling the lumens of small airways and tracking down alveolar ducts to distal airspaces, resulting in cords of branching, arborizing granulation tissue at low magnification (Figures 3 and 4).
Once initiated, the process, powered by the increasing disparity between the enlarging alveolar ducts and the collapsing small alveoli that surround them, is more likely to continue.