AMASS

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AMASS

(Archive Management And Storage System) Tape management software for Unix from Quantum Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO (www.quantum.com). Originally developed by ADIC, AMASS makes the tape library look like an infinite disk drive to the application. At the back end, it manages the robotic mechanisms that move the required tape cartridges to the available tape drives. Supporting optical libraries as well, AMASS is used when an enterprise has exceeded its disk storage and needs to migrate to long-term storage.
References in periodicals archive ?
The novel also parodies the setting of a werewolf narrative by employing an amassment of cliches from a story about a lycanthrope.
The display at the Neue Nationalgalerie--which marked a turning point in de Rooij's career, as his first major project since the untimely death of his longtime collaborator, Jeroen de Rijke, in 2006--conveyed a sense of being not merely an amassment of fascinating things but a work of art.
Yesterday, Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov and his US counterpart John Kerry discussed the problem of troop amassment on the eastern border of Ukraine.
For where the impulse of expatriation is inactive in a given population, there is not only mass but amassment, a principle that Thomas Malthus had years earlier articulated to account for the "extraordinary" (205) population of China, especially as it differed from Japan, its more "warlike ...
Enrile, along with his co-accused, face a series of plunder and graft charges for their alleged years-long amassment of ill-gotten wealth.
It's also a process that can incur the overproduction of free radicals which can further lead to lipid peroxidation (LPO) since chick embryo development is associated with an amassment of polyunsaturated fatty acid in tissue lipids (Speake et al.1998).
This hermeneutic element, furthermore, is integral in the notion of the Towers as representative of a neoliberal space, as through Daud, the novel not only critiques the logistic practices behind their development, but also the ideological policies that turn a blind eye to workers' rights in favor of the monetary amassment of a few (namely the various corrupt construction companies, the police force, and local government officials who all receive a piece of the neoliberal pie).
It could be that Horace intentionally chose to fool the reader into a straightforward reading; expressing enmity between himself and the ex-slave functions as a way of distancing himself from the actions of the ex-slave who flaunts and revels provocatively in the great amassment of wealth (Hills 2005:32).