amaurosis

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amaurosis

[‚a‚mȯ′rō·səs]
(medicine)
Total or partial blindness.
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The visual dysfunction ranged from amaurosis fugax to severe visual loss.
Patients with amaurosis fugax will experience unilateral loss of vision that extends like a dark shade from the top or bottom periphery to the center of vision.
(Figure 1) In terms of the pre-operative symptomatology, 57% of the patients presented transient ischemic attacks (TIA) or Amaurosis Fugax, 39% mild non-disabling stroke, 32% had headaches, and in 4% of the evaluated patients the stenosis was an incidental finding (Figure 2).
A 62-year-old white woman presented to her physician following 3 episodes of transient blindness (amaurosis fugax) in her right eye.
All had experienced a hemispheric transient ischemic attack (TIA), amaurosis fugax (blindness of one eye, often like a shade pulled down over it) lasting less than 24 hours, or a nondisabling stroke within the previous 4 months.
The ophthalmic artery (Table 1) supplies blood to the orbit and the optic nerve.[12] Occlusion of the ophthalmic artery may result in transient mononuclear blindness or complete unilateral blindness.[10] Transient mononuclear blindness or amaurosis fugax is characterized by a brief unilateral visual deficit lasting 15-30 minutes in length.[10,19] The multiple small branches of the ophthalmic artery connect with extensions of the external carotid circulation to provide a path for collateral circulation in cases of internal carotid occlusion.[19]
History of stroke: The major source of controversy in assessing the history of stroke is whether transient ischaemic attacks (TIA) (31/24/0) or amaurosis fugax (22/32/0) should be considered as strokes.
Most CAD patients have no ocular symptoms when OIS occurs except transient visual loss (amaurosis fugax).
Common symptoms include headache; visual symptoms such as diplopia, amaurosis fugax, and vision loss; and masticatory muscle changes such as jaw claudication [3, 4].
[18] analysed and investigated the correlation of amaurosis fugax and carotid stenosis as well as posterior ocular blood vessel haemodynamic changes.
Episodes of amaurosis fugax lasts for minutes to hours may be present.
of episodes Amaurosis fugax 1 Angle closure glaucoma 1 Anterior uveitis/iritis 1 Corneal abrasion 1 Corneal ulcer 1 Herpes keratitis 3 Malignant BCC/SCC/SGC 1 Marginal keratitis 2 Septal cellulitis/peri-orbital 3 Retinal tear/hole 5 Scleritis 3 Viral conjunctivitis 1 Wet AMD 1 Figure 1 Appropriateness of optometrist referral (was the referral appropriate based on outcome of assessment?) Number of patient episodes No 13% Yes 87% Note: Table made from bar graph.