ambiguity

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ambiguity

[‚am·bə′gyü·əd·ē]
(electronics)
The condition in which a synchro system or servosystem seeks more than one null position.
(navigation)
The condition in which navigation coordinates derived from a navigational instrument define more than one point, direction, line of position, or surface of position.

Ambiguity

Delphic oracle
ultimate authority in ancient Greece; often speaks in ambiguous terms. [Gk. Hist.: Leach, 305]
Iseult’s vow
pledge to husband has double meaning. [Arth. Legend: Tristan]
Loxias
epithet of Apollo, meaning “ambiguous” in reference to his practically uninterpretable oracles. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 26]
Pooh-Bah
different opinion for every one of his offices. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]
References in periodicals archive ?
is the prime example and a case in point: The statistical ambiguities in the system backfired and forced a massively expensive single-case clean-up.
Consistent findings in the literature have been that (a) ambiguity detection ability develops during early school age and (b) lexical ambiguity detection develops earlier than does the ability to detect structural ambiguities.
The solution in this study has been to settle for an interpretive approach focusing on experienced ambiguities among the acquired employees: an ambiguity approach.
Deeply immersed in prior scholarship in the field, Maxwell takes great care to interrogate established opinion, pointing out contradictions, ambiguities, and outright errors in earlier arguments-- always with an eye to demonstrating how the dynamics of African American literary production during this period resist easy classification and codification.
Since most Jews object to the division of Jerusalem whereas the Palestinians demand that it become the capital of their state, the said ambiguities may constitute the only hope for a compromise.
The ambiguities of desire are infinitely more interesting than nice, moral passages.
Though my story is not without its ambiguities (after all, as a free agent, I did study under Bernard McGinn, Anne Carr, and David Tracy - three Roman Catholic scholars), I tell it to make two points.
Communication is particularly emphasized as a useful device to negotiate meaning out of the acquisition ambiguities.
Speech Act Theory (Austin 1962, Searle 1969, Searle 1979, De Bruyn 1995) provides a possible framework for analyzing some pragmatic ambiguities, such as may be found in (35):
The preamble to the regulations acknowledges the need to clarify certain ambiguities in existing Treas.
In particular, no conscious attempt seems ever to have been made to construct exhaustive typologies, whether for Greek or for Latin, of the ambiguities made possible by the phonological, morphological, or syntactic characteristics of the language.
In a culture dominated by medicine, social workers' reluctance to admit ambiguities may have reflected medicine's insistence on clarity, its general construction of ambiguity as abnormal, and its reverence for rationality, clarity, and control, as well as its assumptions that clarity is possible and desirable in all situations (e.