ambiguity

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ambiguity

[‚am·bə′gyü·əd·ē]
(electronics)
The condition in which a synchro system or servosystem seeks more than one null position.
(navigation)
The condition in which navigation coordinates derived from a navigational instrument define more than one point, direction, line of position, or surface of position.

Ambiguity

Delphic oracle
ultimate authority in ancient Greece; often speaks in ambiguous terms. [Gk. Hist.: Leach, 305]
Iseult’s vow
pledge to husband has double meaning. [Arth. Legend: Tristan]
Loxias
epithet of Apollo, meaning “ambiguous” in reference to his practically uninterpretable oracles. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 26]
Pooh-Bah
different opinion for every one of his offices. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]
References in periodicals archive ?
As expected, it is difficult to resolve the integer ambiguities with low-cost GNS receivers in a moving condition (only 8% of epochs were fixed to integer).
Paul Tillich (6) suggests another interpretation that might have more explanatory power--especially in the context of our incapability to deal with ambiguities. As Tillich points out, in the Garden of Eden there was no ambiguity.
By applying a linear regression for all stations, when the ambiguities were resolved, the determined ZWD presented a higher value than when no ambiguities were resolved.
[nabla][N.sub.WL] and [nabla][N.sub.NL] are the single-difference wide-lane and narrow-lane integer ambiguities. In this section, because signals in only two frequencies are involved, the wide-lane and narrow-lane represent the corresponding combination of L1 and L2.
Johnson "Resolving Ambiguities in Insurance Policy Language" Pittston Co.
The remaining three pieces of this section discuss different types of ambiguities used as narrative tools in contemporary British fiction, mostly in terms of Empson's classification.
Strategies for enhancing student learning by managing ambiguities in clinical settings.
Ambiguities require explications as "critical scrutiny, where the result is a recommendation or proposal as to how it might best be understood in order to achieve certain philosophical or theoretical objectives" (Fetzer: Philosophy of Science, 1993: 11).
The most salient conceptual point Eterno makes is that policing is a difficult job made even more so by the ambiguities in the law.
The product of several weeks of tough diplomacy, the statement commits the participants to achieving 'the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner.' The statement contains several ambiguities and leaves many difficult issues to be resolved.
A picture in Alan Powers' Modern: the Modern Movement in Britain captivates the ambiguities of the 1930s.
And here especially the texts strain for more general, "theorizing" definitions of the modernity of the urban experience, which show ambiguities, contradictions, and lacunae.