ambiguity

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ambiguity

[‚am·bə′gyü·əd·ē]
(electronics)
The condition in which a synchro system or servosystem seeks more than one null position.
(navigation)
The condition in which navigation coordinates derived from a navigational instrument define more than one point, direction, line of position, or surface of position.

Ambiguity

Delphic oracle
ultimate authority in ancient Greece; often speaks in ambiguous terms. [Gk. Hist.: Leach, 305]
Iseult’s vow
pledge to husband has double meaning. [Arth. Legend: Tristan]
Loxias
epithet of Apollo, meaning “ambiguous” in reference to his practically uninterpretable oracles. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 26]
Pooh-Bah
different opinion for every one of his offices. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]
References in periodicals archive ?
The editors acknowledge that this book is "an ambitious interdisciplinary agenda." It is, in wrestling with such a polyvalent term as "nature." Admitting the ambiguousness of the term, the authors provide some unique definitions, and the editors organize them by arranging each section around common definitions such as "natural world," "human biological nature," or "human nature." The complexities of the term "nature" warrant further scrutiny; yet despite such challenges, the book clarifies the importance of the understanding of nature for the presented topic.
(4.) Thus, the third definition in the Oxford English Dictionary is "Capability of being understood in two or more ways; double or dubious signification, ambiguousness." OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY (2d ed.
Piloting helped testing for clarity and lack of ambiguousness. Factor analysis then conducted for the 100 cases with focusing on the Anti-image matrix correlational coefficients.
As Robin Wood points out (1), the teenaged Simmons embodied a combination of 'innocence and sexuality' producing an ambiguousness that was at odds with what was acceptable in the 1940s British cinema.
Michael Workman (2004), for example, suggests that because of the ambiguousness of working in a virtual environment, leaders must be able to provide additional clarity.
Another problem with the "other resistance" option is its ambiguousness. (251) Although the term "resistance" has not been defined, the BIA has asserted that the term could cover several circumstances, "including expressions of general opposition, attempts to interfere with the enforcement of government policy in particular cases, and other overt forms of resistance to the requirements of family planning law." (252) Despite the BIA's suggestions regarding the coverage of "resistance," there is very little case law analyzing the "other resistance" clause of section 601 (a) and the legislative history behind section 601(a) does not indicate any clear congressional intent regarding the scope of the "other resistance" clause.
The ambiguousness that enveloped the Vietnam conflict, however, and the eventual ferocity of its opposition, changed all that.
The ambiguousness invoked by Anderson in his use of the word "hermaphroditic" is likely a nineteenth-century interpretation rather than a Greek or Roman construction, perhaps suggesting that the fusion of masculine and feminine in Hindu/Javanese mythology is more similar to that of the Greek Hermaphroditus than Anderson implies.
283, 286-87 (2000)(discussing the ambiguousness of Title IX and its legislative history and the fact that courts have, therefore, deferred to the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights).
Ambiguousness in Five of Berceo's Mary Legends," Romanistisches Jahrbuch 37 (1986): 251-63.
The ambiguousness in form allowed the brutal enactments of male violence against women to be seen as misogynist rather than as an exposing of the poison.
The American Model owes its wide acceptance to its ambiguousness and multiple meanings.