ambivalence


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ambivalence

(ămbĭv`ələns), coexistence of two opposing drives, desires, feelings, or emotions toward the same person, object, or goal. The ambivalent person may be unaware of either of the opposing wishes. The term was coined in 1911 by Eugen BleulerBleuler, Eugen
, 1857–1939, Swiss psychiatrist. He taught (1898–1927) at the Univ. of Zürich, serving concurrently as director of Zürich's Burghölzi Asylum.
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, to designate one of the major symptoms of schizophreniaschizophrenia
, group of severe mental disorders characterized by reality distortions resulting in unusual thought patterns and behaviors. Because there is often little or no logical relationship between the thoughts and feelings of a person with schizophrenia, the disorder has
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, the others being autismautism
, developmental disability resulting from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females.
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 and disturbances of affect (i.e., emotion) and of association (i.e., thought disorders). Bleuler felt that there were normal instances of ambivalence, such as the feeling, after performing an action, that it would have been better to have done the opposite; but the normal person, unlike the schizophrenic, is not prevented by these opposing impulses from deciding and acting. In Freudian psychoanalysis, ambivalence was described as feelings of love and hate toward the same person. This specific meaning has attained common usage by psychiatrists and psychoanalysts.

ambivalence

[am′bi·və·ləns]
(psychology)
The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires with respect to a particular person, object, or situation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the next sections, the concept of attitudinal ambivalence and the identified group influence on construction workers' unsafe acts will be discussed, and the possible role of attitudinal ambivalence will be hypothesized for model fitting and comparison.
Ambivalence, the concurrency of negative and positive affective, cognitive, and/or conative evaluations of an object (Conner & Armitage, 2008), has been shown to impede the formation of positive attitudes, behavioral intentions, and behavior (Armitage & Conner, 2000; Jonas, Diehl, & Bromer, 1997).
In addition, if this ambivalence exists, our aim was also to examine how it affected the tendency of young people to interact with their peers.
Finally -- yet more ambivalence -- for 60 years there was a tacit alliance between Arab dictators and their Sunni religious clergy.
All participants completed a survey designed to measure ambivalence, donation concerns, and social support.
In the context of the gun control debate currently taking place at both the federal and state levels, to say that the Senate was ignoring public opinion in tabling the background check measure - or that the Legislature is accurately reflecting it in expanding gun access - is to ignore the intricacies and ambivalence in public opinion on gun control.
Such findings suggest that conventional categories of pregnancy attitudes (wanted, mistimed or unwanted) may be oversimplified and do not account for ambivalence toward future pregnancies or the inability to form definite fertility intentions.
Finally, one might deny that in ambivalence the same person harbors both sentiments.
Open-ended questions are used to help explore client ambivalence and to develop discrepancy.
If ambivalence has been your comfort zone, than these perilous economic and change-driven times give you an opportunity to question and change that.
As noted above, ambivalence concerning the body and the Incarnation has a long history in Christian thought starting with the Gnostic heresies.
Moving ahead with a different vision of what we want for "individual and familial well-being that comports with our nation's norms and sense of human dignity" as Linda Wolf eloquently stated in her related article, "The Reality of Serving" (page 11, October 2008), will require our country to come to grips with its fundamental ambivalence about the reality of poverty an ambivalence rooted in its similarly conflicting views on race.