ambivalence

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ambivalence

(ămbĭv`ələns), coexistence of two opposing drives, desires, feelings, or emotions toward the same person, object, or goal. The ambivalent person may be unaware of either of the opposing wishes. The term was coined in 1911 by Eugen BleulerBleuler, Eugen
, 1857–1939, Swiss psychiatrist. He taught (1898–1927) at the Univ. of Zürich, serving concurrently as director of Zürich's Burghölzi Asylum.
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, to designate one of the major symptoms of schizophreniaschizophrenia
, group of severe mental disorders characterized by reality distortions resulting in unusual thought patterns and behaviors. Because there is often little or no logical relationship between the thoughts and feelings of a person with schizophrenia, the disorder has
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, the others being autismautism
, developmental disability resulting from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females.
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 and disturbances of affect (i.e., emotion) and of association (i.e., thought disorders). Bleuler felt that there were normal instances of ambivalence, such as the feeling, after performing an action, that it would have been better to have done the opposite; but the normal person, unlike the schizophrenic, is not prevented by these opposing impulses from deciding and acting. In Freudian psychoanalysis, ambivalence was described as feelings of love and hate toward the same person. This specific meaning has attained common usage by psychiatrists and psychoanalysts.

ambivalence

[am′bi·və·ləns]
(psychology)
The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires with respect to a particular person, object, or situation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any who are driven to the pen and who want a revealing saga of one author's journey toward teaching, writing, and self-realization will find The Ambivalent Memoirist packed with vivid, compelling insights: "The thing about living in the center of the world is that it wasn't always my own life I was in the middle of.
Nymphea and Amarillo travel over to Haydock from leading trainer Peter Schiergen's stable to take on Ambivalent and Eton Forever respectively.
Only 62% of women who were identified as ambivalent by the single-item measure were considered to be ambivalent about pregnancy by the pLMUP; 21% were classified by the pLMUP as not planning for pregnancy, and 17% as planning for pregnancy.
Among respondents who experience a very high level of SoL, 99% have a high sense of freedom and 1% have an ambivalent attitude to it.
Doe stated that "Anglican canon laws are ambivalent to global communion," and that, "indeed, lack of developed law in churches on inter-Anglicans increases the likelihood of conflict.
By reinterpreting childhood heroines in erotic postures with animals, she accentuated our ambivalent relationship to traditional feminine stereotypes.
About as interesting as it sounds, largely due to ambivalent presentation and characters who are ciphers.
Sykes deals forthrightly with the difficulty of exercising any ecclesial power in light of modern concepts of power and the contemporary pluralistic context, which is ambivalent about any exercise of power and offers a theological understanding of power grounded in a doctrine of creation.
Befriending Jim and betraying Jim, Huck establishes the ambivalent pattern for over a hundred years of black-white bonding in southern fiction.
despite the prevalence of divorce, marriage still has this structure: One is either married or not (however ambivalent the underlying feelings may be); one cannot be married to more than one person at a time; marrying someone is a fateful, sometimes life-transforming choice; and despite divorce, marriages are still meant to last.
The Ambivalent Author: Five German Writers and Their Jewish Characters, 1848-1914, by Hannah Burdekin.
Although somewhat underestimating the extent that some feminist scholars have recognized the ambivalent meanings inherent in Judith, Randolph provides a detailed discussion of the multiple and shifting meanings of the subject.