amblyopia


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amblyopia

[am′blē′ōp·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Dimness of vision, especially that not due to refractive errors or organic disease of the eye; may be congenital or acquired.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fortunately, amblyopia is completely treatable if the condition is diagnosed early - preferably before the age of six.
Amblyopia was most common in nystagmus blockage syndrome (100%) and least common in Duane retraction syndrome (16.
13 Similar with these studies, in the present study, the prevalence of decreased visual acuity was detected at the highest rate in children aged 7, 8, and 9 years old which were accepted as limit ages for treatment of amblyopia.
During my short stay in Qatar, several children have been detected with amblyopia, even at later ages such as age 12.
The patients were classified into different types of amblyopia like anisometropic, strabismic, sensory deprivation and meridional amblyopia.
Of the nearly 5,000 children aged 12 years and below, over 60 per cent had amblyopia, while in the age group of six years and below, nearly 85 per cent suffered from the condition.
7) While understanding the neural nature of amblyopia has been the subject of various investigations over many years, given the amblyopic relationship with the spatial properties of the neurons in the primary visual cortex, neurophysiological researchers believe that such damage can be observed in higher visual pathway centers.
At the time, no single tool had been developed that was capable of reliably identifying amblyopia risk factors.
In amblyopia, the most common cause of vision problems among children around the world, the brain learns to favor the images of a stronger eye over those from one that is weaker or misaligned.
Amblyopia represents all the cases of diminished visual capacity, no matter the etiology and severity, or the diminishing of the sight which is present even after the right correction has been applied (Rozorea, 1998, Cziker, 2001, p.