ambrotype


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ambrotype

[′am·brə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
An obsolete method of photography in which a negative is formed in a collodion emulsion on glass; when backed with black velvet or black varnish, the collodion surface reflects positive highlights and the resulting effect is that of a positive.
References in periodicals archive ?
A magnet will tell you if it is a tintype (attracting to it) as opposed to an ambrotype (which will not, since it is on glass).
There are many examples in the Picture Collection of delicately hand-tinted daguerrotype and ambrotype portraits.
Falk briefly covered Menken's American years and, persuaded by an ambrotype of Menken at age 18, accepted Menken's claim that she had been born into the Jewish faith, asserting that the photograph decidedly convinces us that she is "one belonging to the Jewish race.
Here, also, a colored ambrotype of Wilde aged two in a lace-trimmed blue velvet dress--not unusual attire for male children of the period--and looking like a pretty little girl.
The Schnitzer will receive $3,000 to buy two ambrotype prints - "Study Nest 25" and "Study Nest 8, 2008" - by fine art photographer Susan Seubert.
THIS cased photograph is an example of one of the earliest photographic processes, known as the ambrotype.
In The House of the Seven Gables, Hawthorne's most sustained examination of photography, he writes at a moment when daguerreotypy, so dominant in the 1840s, was being replaced by a new technology, the ambrotype.
By the mid 1850s these had been superseded by the ambrotype - images on glass with a black, painted back.
Examples in other daguerreotype and ambrotype images substantiate this early date for floral bags and they indicate that this decorative style of beading was routinely being made in the 1850s.
Patented in 1854, the ambrotype produces images on glass.
Motion's portrait of Fanny Brawne is wonderfully rendered; it is to his credit that over the course of his account we come to understand how Keats could have been so drawn to this frivolous and yet profoundly steadfast young woman (included is a stunning ambrotype of her taken in 1850, more than twenty-five years after Keats's death, and she is still at once pensive and sensual --the embodiment of Keatsian femininity).
An article, "Early Photography" by Peter Johnson UE, provided an analysis of several emerging methods in photography from the daguerreotype to the Calotype or Talbotype, the Ambrotype, the Tintype or Ferrotype and the Carte-de-Viste (Card Photography).