ambrotype


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ambrotype

[′am·brə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
An obsolete method of photography in which a negative is formed in a collodion emulsion on glass; when backed with black velvet or black varnish, the collodion surface reflects positive highlights and the resulting effect is that of a positive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, as if inspired to seek ever more elemental encounters with the natural world, he has spent the past few years metonymically capturing images of mineral formations via a series of inventive photographic procedures--for instance, placing emulsion-coated glass plates in petrifying caves (that is, caves where objects calcify very rapidly), generating ambrotypes that gradually developed over the course of months.
Ambrotype--Appearing from the mid-1850s to the mid-1860s, ambrotypes were developed directly on a glass plate (not a silver-coated copper plate of the daguerreotype or the iron of the tintype).
This ambrotype, for which Custer probably sat in 1859 while on leave from West Point, is displayed at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., which reopened July 1 following six years of renovations.
Emerson, His Younger Daughter and Son)" and described as a photogravure "From an ambrotype taken in 1858." (46) It shows Emerson at fifty-five seated with his seventeen-year-old younger daughter Edith perched on his lap and his gangling adolescent son Edward (at age fourteen) standing to his right.
Also: Connoisseurs of Clay: Collecting Contemporary Ceramics; Untangling Intaglios and Other Print Processes Made Plain; and Jacob Lawrence: Toussaint L'Ouverture, all through July 24, as well as A is for Ambrotype, through Sept.
There are many examples in the Picture Collection of delicately hand-tinted daguerrotype and ambrotype portraits.
Falk briefly covered Menken's American years and, persuaded by an ambrotype of Menken at age 18, accepted Menken's claim that she had been born into the Jewish faith, asserting that the photograph decidedly convinces us that she is "one belonging to the Jewish race." That picture is reproduced in his book, with the caption claiming the picture shows Menken is "unmistakably a Jewess." Sentilles points out that this is certainly weak "evidence," though she is wrong in claiming that Falk's view was influenced by the next serious biography, Allen Lesser's Enchanted Rebel (1947), since the first edition of Falk's book preceded Lesser's by 13 years while Falk's 1952 "edition" is merely a reprint of his earlier work.
Here, also, a colored ambrotype of Wilde aged two in a lace-trimmed blue velvet dress--not unusual attire for male children of the period--and looking like a pretty little girl.
The Schnitzer will receive $3,000 to buy two ambrotype prints - "Study Nest 25" and "Study Nest 8, 2008" - by fine art photographer Susan Seubert.
THIS cased photograph is an example of one of the earliest photographic processes, known as the ambrotype. It was particularly popular from 1855 to 1865, although it continued to be used until later in the century, and was the successor to what is generally considered the earliest practical form of photograph, the daguerreotype, named after its inventor, Louis Daguerre.
In The House of the Seven Gables, Hawthorne's most sustained examination of photography, he writes at a moment when daguerreotypy, so dominant in the 1840s, was being replaced by a new technology, the ambrotype. Hawthorne's interest in photography is also evident in his earlier writings.
By the mid 1850s these had been superseded by the ambrotype - images on glass with a black, painted back.